SER 1-1-1-6 in finished wall

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Old 02-14-14, 10:08 AM
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SER 1-1-1-6 in finished wall

I am putting a 100 amp subpanel on the other end of my basement because I am out of space in the existing panel and the main panel is in a finished wall. The route of the SER 1-1-1-6 AL is shown in the pic in RED.

1. How do I protect the cable in the wall (to prevent something hitting it in the future).

2. Can I come into the side of the panel (lower right) or should I go down further and come up from the bottom (a little easier since I don't need to be drilling the 2x3 along side of the panel).
 
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Old 02-14-14, 03:22 PM
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You can use the side of the panel but you will need a large hole in the stud to fit the cable connector.

The cable is protected by being no closer than 1 1/4 inch to the face of the framing.

The bus stabs may not allow a 100 amp breaker on the bus. The limit should be on the label. I seriously doubt you need even a 60 amp panel for the basement.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 07:16 PM
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The bus stabs may not allow a 100 amp breaker on the bus. The limit should be on the label. I seriously doubt you need even a 60 amp panel for the basement.
It looks like a Square D QO loadcenter so there is no problem installing a 100 amp breaker, but I agree with PCboss, you probably don't need a full 100 amps. I'd also recommend and 60 amp subpanel.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 07:20 PM
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Just in case it needs writing. It is okay to use a 100 amp panel as a subpanel to give you the number of spaces you need for breakers but it does not have to be supplied by a 100 amp breaker. It is common to use a 60 amp breaker.
 
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Old 02-14-14, 07:32 PM
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I don't know if you will be cutting out any drywall, but even if you don't you might be able to squeeze one of these guys inbetween the stud and drywall your panel is mounted on to protect your cable.
COOPER B-LINE Wire Protection Plate,Press On - Electrical Box Cover Accessories - 4RHZ8|BM3M - Grainger Industrial Supply

They make different styles including L shaped ones which screw to the side of a stud instead of the face.
Or in a pinch you could slide a 4x4 cover in there.
 
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Old 02-16-14, 12:56 AM
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I was more concerned about having such a high capacity wire inside the drywall cavity more then where it passes through the stud to the panel. Since the cable will be coming down the middle of the cavity next to the panel, someone might one day want to drive a nail or screw into the wall and hit it (a standard romex would probably just move away from the screw or nail but this heavy cable would be fairly stiff.)
 
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Old 02-16-14, 07:01 AM
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I was more concerned about having such a high capacity wire inside the drywall cavity more then where it passes through the stud to the panel. Since the cable will be coming down the middle of the cavity next to the panel, someone might one day want to drive a nail or screw into the wall and hit it (a standard romex would probably just move away from the screw or nail but this heavy cable would be fairly stiff.
Yet another reason to use 6-3 NM-b copper and a 60 amp breaker as has been suggested. Can you give us a list of expected simultaneous loads that require the size cable you want to use?
 
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Old 02-16-14, 11:52 AM
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Since the cable will be coming down the middle of the cavity next to the panel, someone might one day want to drive a nail or screw into the wall and hit it (a standard romex would probably just move away from the screw or nail but this heavy cable would be fairly stiff.)
No, a standard romex cable (NM-B) will not move away from a screw, but will be penetrated the same as an SER cable.
 
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