Splicing existing unused range circuit.

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  #1  
Old 02-17-14, 08:38 AM
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Splicing existing unused range circuit.

Hi all!
I have a range circuit that is no longer in use due to installing a gas range. I now want to tap off of the existing 4 wire circuit and run a 240v line to my basement. The wire for the range is 6 awg aluminum stranded 4 wire two hots a neutral and bare ground. What do I need to do to make these connections? What kind of wire would be recommended for the extension run to the basement for 20 amp 240?
 
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Old 02-17-14, 08:49 AM
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For the cost of the materials needed it would be easier to run a new 20 amp circuit. The aluminum connectors are expensive.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 08:57 AM
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Well if I were to run a new circuit it would be very long as my panel is out in the garage on the farthest corner from where i am needing the outlet in the basement. plus my garage is dry walled so there would be the issue of fishing new wire through there.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 09:05 AM
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Then you are going to need to install a permanently accessible junction box and splice the new cable to the old. I would suggest Polaris pre-insulated connectors. .
 
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Old 02-17-14, 09:14 AM
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What kind of wire would be recommended for the extension run to the basement for 20 amp 240?
For a 20 amp, 240 volt circuit, all you need is 12-2 NM-B cable (aka romex). You will not need the neutral conductor of the old range circuit, there is no neutral in a 240 volt circuit. What will the circuit be used for? The splice can be made as PCboss has indicated. The breaker in the panel will need to be changed to a 20 amp 2 pole.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 09:24 AM
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It will be used for a Amateur Radio Amplifier that says it needs 240v at 15 amps. I thought I would need the 2 hots and the neutral and disregard the bare ground? Is that wrong?
 
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Old 02-17-14, 09:38 AM
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A straight 240 circuit does not use a neutral. It does need a ground.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 09:41 AM
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It will be used for a Amateur Radio Amplifier that says it needs 240v at 15 amps. I thought I would need the 2 hots and the neutral and disregard the bare ground? Is that wrong?
Yes, that is wrong. The neutral is only needed if you need to get 120 volts from the circuit like in the case of the old electric range. You need two insulated hot conductors and one ground conductor for a 240 volt circuit. The white conductor of the 12-2 should be re-identified with another color by marker or phasing tape, I'd use red. ALL circuits need to have the ground conductor which can be bare or green.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 02-17-14 at 11:03 AM. Reason: clarify
  #9  
Old 02-17-14, 10:23 AM
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I believe Joe was referring to the 12-2 to the new receptacle.
 
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Old 02-17-14, 10:28 AM
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That's right, Ray, sorry I didn't make that clear.
 
  #11  
Old 02-17-14, 11:05 PM
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Well I ended up using a two gang box to make my splice in. I am using 10/2 MC armor wire as I have to run down a concrete basement wall. I used the split bolts for aluminum copper joins with the separator in the middle so the copper and aluminum wires never directly contact each other rubber taped,replaced breaker with 20 amp and I'm off to the races!
 
  #12  
Old 02-18-14, 07:37 AM
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I am using 10/2 MC armor wire as I have to run down a concrete basement wall.
It all sounds pretty good except for a technicality. Aluminum MC cable should not be in direct contact with any cementitious material such as masonry or concrete because it will cause the aluminum to corrode. I have seen the aluminum sheathing totally disappear by corrosion within 5 or 6 years when the aluminum MC cable was penetrating a poured concrete wall. Steel MC cable, however, is acceptable. Note that I have only seen a few inspectors ever catch this. Electrically your plan is sound, but you may have to replace the MC cable in a few years.
 

Last edited by CasualJoe; 02-18-14 at 08:01 AM.
  #13  
Old 02-18-14, 06:30 PM
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A running board can be installed behind the cable to remove it from the concrete.
 
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