14 on 20A = too much for 15A


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Old 02-20-14, 07:38 AM
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14 on 20A = too much for 15A

I found some #14 spliced with #12 on my kitchen circuit. I think it was just on the lighting portion but I am not positive. So I swapped out the 20A for a 15A.

Now Im hoping I don't have the kitchen breaker tripping. My fridge say 6.5A. I have about 300W of lightning on the circuit too.

I also have a 900W coffee pot.

I probably don't have much if any wiggle room here.... have I made a mistake for downsizing the breaker?
 
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Old 02-20-14, 07:44 AM
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Downsizing the breaker while the smaller wiring was in place was your only option until the #14 can be replaced. Otherwise the wiring is not protected against overheating and a potentially negative outcome.

Plan on replacing the wire with # 12. Also the lighting should not be on the small appliance kitchen circuits.
 
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Old 02-20-14, 07:45 AM
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I think it was just on the lighting portion but I am not positive. So I swapped out the 20A for a 15A
Good temporary fix but you should consider current code does not allow lights on the counter top receptacle circuits. You should consider isolating the lights to their own 15 amp circuit and insuring you have two 20 amp counter top receptacle circuits on #12.
 
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Old 02-20-14, 07:49 AM
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I am curious about the coffee pot 900W coupled with 300W of light and a 6.5A fridge.... do you think I will have issues here?
 
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Old 02-20-14, 07:56 AM
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The refrigerator may be an issue if it tries to start while both the lights and coffeepot are in use. That still does not make it correct in the eyes of the code.
 
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Old 02-20-14, 09:11 AM
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pcboss


The refrigerator may be an issue if it tries to start while both the lights and coffeepot are in use. That still does not make it correct in the eyes of the code.

My question wasn't about the NEC requirments for 2 small appliance circuits in a kitchen. My house is 60 years old, Im grandfathered there as far as I am concerned.

So my only concern here (besides coming up with about a grand or two to rewire) is if I have a 15a breaker loaded or not.

I remember reading there is a percentage of allowable continuous load on a breaker and I wondering if I fall under that rule of thumb.
 
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Old 02-20-14, 09:22 AM
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You are not dealing with a continuous load. A continuous load is on for 3 hours or more.
 
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Old 02-20-14, 06:03 PM
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I am curious about the coffee pot 900W coupled with 300W of light and a 6.5A fridge.... do you think I will have issues here?
Definitely borderline with a 15A breaker.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 02:20 PM
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I know its not ideal, but is it uncommon to find a kitchen in an old home on a single 15?


Here I find 14 on a 20A circuit and thought I was doing the safe thing by downsizing, now the wife is complaining saying we are overloading the 15!
 
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Old 02-22-14, 02:36 PM
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You need to run a new circuit to the kitchen, ideally two, even if you have to run conduit around the outside of the house.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 03:24 PM
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The kitchen connects to a small dining area. That is also on a 15. Actually they are a mwbc. Theres 2 outlets that are on that circuit that are actually in the kitchen and that is what we are using for the small appliances.

So the kitchen 15 is supply a 6.5 fridge and 300W of light. The other circuit is where the coffee pot is and microwave. (Not using both at the same time obviously.) the dishwasher, stove (gas) and range hood are on a dedicated circuit already.

Does that make a difference in this case? (I know it doesn't in regards to NEC)
 
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Old 02-22-14, 04:21 PM
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If you were overloading the 15A circuit you would be tripping a circuit breaker.... constantly.
At least now that you've put a 15A breaker on that line.... the wiring is safe again.
You've got your kitchen pretty well split up for now.

You can look to adding a dedicated 20A circuit to assist there in the future.
 
 

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