Dryer Receptacle

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  #1  
Old 02-22-14, 04:00 PM
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Dryer Receptacle

I am renovating an old home and recently had some electrical wiring done. The electrician installed a NEMA 6-50 receptacle for the clothes dryer. The owner's dryer has a standard four-prong plug. Would it be as simple as changing the wall receptacle to a four-prong variety or are there some amperage or other issues I don't know about. I have never seen a 6-50 receptacle put in - it has three wires to it, one black, one white and a ground. Any help would be appreciated. I hate to get the electrician back out but will if necessary.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 04:17 PM
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The electrician installed a NEMA 6-50 receptacle for the clothes dryer.
Are you sure he was a real electrician? What size breaker? The NEMA 650 is the wrong size and does not have the code required ground.
Would it be as simple as changing the wall receptacle to a four-prong variety
If he ran 3 conductors and a ground, yes but he didn't.
three wires to it, one black, one white and a ground.
The only way that could work is if he used the bare wire as a neutral and that hasn't been code compliant in many many years. There is really nothing salvageable from what he did. He need to give you a refund and you need to hire a real electrician to do the whole thing from scratch..
 
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Old 02-22-14, 05:29 PM
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it has three wires to it, one black, one white and a ground.
It sounds like he ran 10-2 NM-B cable (aka romex). 10-2 NM cable with a bare ground serving as the neutral has never been code compliant. When the three wire dryer circuits were allowed, the proper NM cable was 10-3 plain (no ground), the neutral had to be insulated and grounding was done through that insulated neutral. I am also wondering if this was a real electrician or a handyman.

I hate to get the electrician back out but will if necessary.
I wouldn't feel too bad about it since he did it wrong. He shouldn't charge you to fix his mistake.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 05:41 PM
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Electric Dryer Receptacle

Actually, he's got a good reputation. But it pi--es me off that he didn't run a four wire cable - the fuse box is only about ten feet from the dryer receptacle location. Seems like a four-prong plug is pretty standard on new dryers. So now the dryer won't work until I can get him back out to run new wiring and put in a new receptacle. Is there some reason to use a three wire cable and the 6-50? Is it cheaper? Does it take a higher amperage breaker? I'm sure this guy knows better.

Anyway, I'll get him back out to make the change. Thanks so much for taking the time to reply.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 06:05 PM
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Actually, he's got a good reputation.
That's surprising considering he is obviously a little short on knowledge of his trade and code.

Seems like a four-prong plug is pretty standard on new dryers.
Electric dryers and ranges don't come with cords. A 30 amp 4-wire dryer circuit has been required for a while, but there are still 3-wire receptacles and cords available for existing circuits. I have also noticed how appliance sales people will usually push the 3-wire cords, probably because they are cheaper.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 06:57 PM
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So sad to see someone charging and not having the knowledge or parts to properly install what the customer is paying for.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 07:25 PM
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Is there some reason to use a three wire cable and the 6-50
He didn't use 3-wire cable. He used 2-conductor cable with ground. You needed a 3-conductor cable with ground. This guy can't bean electrician. Ask for your money back and hire a real electrician. Heaven knows what other mistakes he made you didn't recognize.
 
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Old 02-22-14, 07:31 PM
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Even back in the 80's using a 10-2 NM would not have been code compliant.
 
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Old 02-23-14, 10:07 AM
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Even back in the 80's using a 10-2 NM would not have been code compliant.
Nor was it in the 60s and 70s.
 
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