Using a 125V humidifier in a 220V environment


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Old 02-28-14, 10:46 AM
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Question Using a 125V humidifier in a 220V environment

Hey Guys,

Just got back to Germany from the US and brought with me this (cheap) humidifier.
On its plug it says 10A, 125V and since we in Germany have 220V coming out of our outlet, I also bought this (cheap) transformator. It let's me plug in the US plug and converts the voltage down to 110V.

Now that I've plugged it all in, the 'nightlight' of the humidifier turned on and stayed that way for 20mins, but nothing happened, no steam, didn't even get warm. All that happened was the transformator getting really warm.
After 20mins, the red control-light of the transformator turned off and so did the humidifier. Now the transformator seems to be broken (although fuse is intact) and I'm left with no more options..

Why could this happen, what did I do wrong? On the transformator, it says Max. 50W, do you guys think that is the problem? Like that the humidifier needs more than 50W and in the process also broke the transformator?

Thanks for any help!
All the best,
Radiant
 
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Old 02-28-14, 10:52 AM
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Since it's a cheap humidifier, I'd just buy a new one over there for the correct voltage and not waste my time and money with the 125 volt one..
 
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Old 02-28-14, 10:55 AM
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On the transformator, it says Max. 50W, do you guys think that is the problem?
Yes and if it has a motor the frequency also.
On its plug it says 10A
which is 1200 watts which is 24 times the output of your transformer.
 
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Old 02-28-14, 10:56 AM
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The humidifier states it needs 10 amperes at 125 volts. Multiply amperes by volts to get watts, 10x125 equals 1250 watts and you are trying to power it with a device limited to 50 watts, or roughly 1/25 of the power needed. What do you think?
 
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Old 02-28-14, 10:57 AM
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Oh, guess I fried it then ..

Soooo before I throw everything out, trying to just plug the humidifier into the wall with a regular plug converter is probably is stupid idea, right? Or is there nothing to loose?
 
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Old 02-28-14, 11:09 AM
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If you plug that unit directly into a 220 volt circuit you will fry it almost instantly. If you want to use a converter then it must be rated for at least 1250 watts. That large a converter plug would not be inexpensive nor would it be common.
 
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Old 02-28-14, 11:24 AM
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Ok Ok Ok thanks!

Will buy a different one then..

Btw. we should all get along already electrically speaking and find a common voltage ground + plug size, this stuff is annoying ..
 
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Old 02-28-14, 11:36 AM
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In addition we would have to change frequency as the US and Canada (Mexico?) are using 60 Hertz while most of the rest of the world uses 50 Hertz. Might as well ask for a common currency and a universal language while we are wishing.
 
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Old 03-01-14, 06:17 AM
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There is a good chance the dehumidifier will overheat even if you did give it 120 volts. A 60 Hz appliance should generally not be given 50 Hz power. But for those eavesdropping, you can usually get away with vice versa if the appliance seems to work okay and, if it can be variably loaded such as a tool, it is not subjected to maximum load.

(Appliances such as plain heaters with no mechanical or electronic parts will work okay on any frequency and on the correct voltage or a little, even 25%, less.)
 
 

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