#10 solid or stranded?

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Old 03-01-14, 05:30 PM
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#10 solid or stranded?

I have to pull about 50 ft. of #10 for a air conditioner and another 50' for a dryer, should I use solid or standed?
 
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Old 03-01-14, 06:13 PM
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Stranded wire is much easier to pull and work with, but it's a tradeoff. Solid wire is generally a little cheaper, but has a slightly higher labor unit. Labor is always the big ticket on any job, I'd use stranded and keep my labor down.
 
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Old 03-01-14, 06:13 PM
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Stranded or solid 12 awg wire? - Electrician Talk - Professional Electrical Contractors Forum

There is a discussion on it. Stranded seems to be the winner.
 
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Old 03-01-14, 06:23 PM
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The flexibility and ease of using solid wire depends on the alloy. In the old days, solid TW wire was not terribly stiff or hard to work with, but today's THHN/THWN solid wire is extremely stiff and difficult to work with and that includes pulling. Some old school engineers still specify that all conductors #10 and smaller be solid and those projects always deserve some good qualifications on the proposals. Anyone who has ever worked with solid wire in recent years will jump at the chance to use stranded wire on a job.
 
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Old 03-01-14, 09:00 PM
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I use stranded whenever I can. Much easier to work with.
 
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Old 03-02-14, 04:41 AM
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Is there any other reason besides ease of pull that I would want to use stranded for these two applications?

The pull is somewhere around 50-75' -- NO 90's, theres a 2 inch saddle and two 30 deg offset to contend with.

I prefer to use solid but I don't want to buy all that wire and not be able to pull it thru..... any other suggestions welcome.

The dryer needs 3 - #10's,
 
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Old 03-02-14, 05:25 AM
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I always tried to push branch circuits , when ever possible . That turns it into a 1 person operation . Solid wire pushes much easier than stranded . And , it is cheaper , but in your small quantity , may not much matter ?

Pulling wire is often a 2 person operation .

All building wire above # 10 is stranded , so for larger wire , it is a non issue .

If in doubt , use wire lube ( Ideal Yellow 77 is good ) .

God bless
Wyr
 
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Old 03-02-14, 07:01 AM
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I prefer to use solid but I don't want to buy all that wire and not be able to pull it thru..... any other suggestions welcome.

The dryer needs 3 - #10's,
Then use solid if that's what you prefer. It's a little more difficult to make up devices using solid, but no biggy, just easier with stranded. You need 4 wires for a dryer circuit unless you are using the conduit as your ground. You'll need to use a 4-wire receptacle.
 
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Old 03-02-14, 09:29 AM
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Make your life easier and use a larger box for your receptacle too. Gives you more room to fold your wires.
 
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