Code for Running 4awg in NY?

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Old 03-04-14, 12:50 PM
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Code for Running 4awg in NY?

I'm running a 100FT of 4/3 for a sub panel and was curious if anyone had clear requirements on my options. I have the walls and ceiling open, but I have plumbing and other electric that needs to be considered. I'm currently looking at have the wire mounted behind the wall attached to the back of studs about 6' off the ground for about 30' of the run .... Will that conform to code? In other areas I will have it clamped to the ceiling, running through some conduit, etc.... If anyone has the requirements for NY (Long Island).

I was looking at section 200.6 of the electric code, but doesn't seem to address this and I can't cut and paste out of that document.

Thank you
 
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Old 03-04-14, 05:36 PM
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It depends on what part of Long Island. It starts with the National Code but various towns & incorporated villages have laws that supersede the National Code. 6' from the ground is okay. I'm not sure about the rest. If you tell me the exact location, I can call a friend of mine. He should know.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 06:18 PM
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Appreciate that... Thanks. Brookhaven Town, Suffolk County. I'm also curious whether it's ok to use metal clamps to secure the Romex wire to wood. Someone said I should use plastic, but that doesn't make sense. I would be interested to hear peoples thoughts on that.

Thanks !
 
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Old 03-04-14, 06:22 PM
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Why don't you just call your local AHJ and ask?
 
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Old 03-04-14, 06:38 PM
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AHJ? I'm guessing that's Authority Having Jurisdiction? I'm not exactly sure who that would be. The local building department does not field those kind of questions. They simply say, hire an electrician.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 06:54 PM
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AHJ? I'm guessing that's Authority Having Jurisdiction? I'm not exactly sure who that would be. The local building department does not field those kind of questions. They simply say, hire an electrician.
Then ask them what agency handles electrical inspections. If they say that they do, ask to speak to the department head. All you really want to ask is what code and version they follow for electrical. All the information you need is probably posted online, have you checked yet?
 
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Old 03-04-14, 07:06 PM
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Don't call them. You'll open a can of worms. I'm almost 100% sure that you can't do your own electrical work in Brookhaven even if it's to code. It may be okay with plumbing. Either way, I'll ask a friend tomorrow. He doesn't live far from there.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 07:10 PM
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It is and I have it ... It's just very vague and does not address my specific questions. I also have 2011 National Code which is very detailed but somewhat difficult to interpret. I'm quite certain that what I'm doing conforms to code and is probably overly cautious but definitely like hearing other opinions and suggestions. At some point I'm going to have a licensed electrician do some work here and will ask them to check anything that I did myself.

<<<All electrical installations shall be in accordance with the National Electrical Fire Code, except that aluminum wiring shall not be permitted on the load side of the service disconnect in dwellings, buildings or structures for which residential occupancy is a permitted use.>>> From the Town Code.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 09:19 PM
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At some point I'm going to have a licensed electrician do some work here and will ask them to check anything that I did myself>
I wish you luck with that approach. Since it's my license and bond on the line for anything that I touch on a job, I'm a homeowner's worst nightmare of an inspector.

You did some work, and you want me to sign off on it? Sure, no problem. Can I see your permit?

If you can show me your permit and your inspection stamps. I may wonder why you're asking me to look at it but I won't feel exposed in doing so.

If you don't have a permit that's been followed up with inspections, the fund you've set aside for college tuition for your children may be sufficient to cover the work.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 09:25 PM
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I also have 2011 National Code which is very detailed but somewhat difficult to interpret.
The NEC is a minimum-standards model code. It does not prescribe methods. It also has no authority until and unless it is adopted by an AHJ. In addition, many AHJs include their own requirements in the adopting legislation, which supersede or amend parts of the NEC.

Those of us who do this work have been tested on our knowledge of the code, including the NEC. We can get into heated debates about which of several interpretations might apply in a particular circumstance, but we can point to the sections we think determine the answer and defend our decisions.

Your local inspectors are the gods in this. Find them and ask them.
 
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Old 03-04-14, 10:44 PM
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Most of the licensed electricians that I spoke regarding my service upgrade and sub-panel installation suggested that I run the 4/3 line. To be honest, there is absolutely no way I would want anyone running that line through my walls except me. Unlike the electrical contractor, I will fix issues with the framing, plumbing or anything else that I encounter while running that line. And if it takes me two weeks to do it right, so be it. Once I'm finished the electrician will be coming out here to scope the work, and if he has any issue with the way the line is run, I will obviously fix it.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 06:47 AM
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I agree, we don't work on anything non-electrical. Most of us do take pains not to damage anything else though.

One question: What type of cable are you running -- NM or MC?
 
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Old 03-05-14, 08:29 AM
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It's romex 4/3 w/ground.

I definitely don't think anyone would damage anything deliberately. However, on fixed priced jobs, time is money and if something isn't right, they'll probably find a work-around.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 10:21 AM
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But why does someone in Colorado care what the New York code is?

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Old 03-05-14, 10:35 AM
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You're the second or third person who pointed that out.... I will update the profile.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 11:14 AM
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on fixed priced jobs, time is money and if something isn't right, they'll probably find a work-around.
Only if they don't value their professional license. "Up to code" isn't the motto of those who are successful in this business. "Codes or better" is.

Anyone who quotes you a fixed price on work that involves unknowns such as what might be encountered when walls are opened will either quote you a price that's high enough to cover almost any surprise, or they're a fool. Do you want to work with either of those?
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:10 PM
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Definitely Not. When it comes to running wire and maybe this applies more to telephone, cable, ethernet, or low voltage (I realize it's a lot different than electric), I find that people are very quick to drill or just do things that are unnecessary ... And rarely does anyone think (besides the homeowner) about having to run new wire in the future, how would I access that line if I had to, or anything like that.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:21 PM
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in the future, how would I access that line if I had to, or anything like that.
Why would you need to access this cable (the wires are inside it) in the future, other than at the ends?
 
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Old 03-05-14, 02:05 PM
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I can't say specifically why I would ever need to see this cable again, but my homeowner experience tells me that everything I ever bury or make difficult to access, I will need to see again for some reason or another. Hopefully I'm wrong.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 02:54 PM
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When was the last time you needed to see an electrical cable inside a wall?
 
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Old 03-05-14, 09:34 PM
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I never have. I have had electricians have to service existing cables in the wall after a tree fell on my drop from the street. It pulled my meter off the house and moved my panel. Big mess.

I think this thread has run its course. Appreciate the opinions and suggestions.
 
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