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How do I seal surface mount holes in the back of a flush mounted breaker panel?

How do I seal surface mount holes in the back of a flush mounted breaker panel?

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  #1  
Old 03-04-14, 09:26 PM
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How do I seal surface mount holes in the back of a flush mounted breaker panel?

An upcoming kitchen remodel has forced me to replace the filled to capacity main lug panel with 24 tandem breakers and no empty spaces to a new 40 circuit Homeline main panel that I'm using as a sub. The panel could be mounted as either flush or surface mount. I installed it as a flush mount in place of the old panel, however, I totally forgot about the fiberglass insulation in the 2x6 wall. Now you can see the tightly compressed insulation behind the panel through the surface mount holes. The 4 holes are each about the size of a nickel.

Short of pulling out the panel and re-mounting it, how do I seal these holes? The old panel was intended only for flush mount so there were no holes in the back of the can. I pulled an electrical permit with the intent of having my work inspected so I don't have issues when I look to sell in a few years. Now I just need to pass inspection!
 
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  #2  
Old 03-04-14, 09:29 PM
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I have never had an inspector ask for those holes to be sealed.
 
  #3  
Old 03-04-14, 09:41 PM
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I should probably clarify. My concern isn't so much about the holes themselves, but rather the insulation that is slightly bulging into the can through the holes. My thought is that this could be a potential fire issue.
 
  #4  
Old 03-04-14, 09:57 PM
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Fiberglass insulation is not flammable and if you have a fire in the panel it is the least of your worries.
 
  #5  
Old 03-05-14, 07:19 AM
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My thought is the thickness of the fibreglas insulation should have been reduced before the panel was installed. In a compressed state, the fibreglas provides little if any insulating thermal barrier.
 
  #6  
Old 03-06-14, 07:11 PM
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Lack of insulation really isn't an issue. The box is in an attached garage that is fully insulated and climate controlled in FL, so loss of insulation is minimal. Why the previous owner decided to insulate the garage and hook up HVAC bewilders me.


Inspector came by today and I passed. Thanks everyone.
 
  #7  
Old 03-07-14, 05:46 AM
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If it bothers you so much, you can get some of that foil tape and just cover them. Are they sized to accept the plugs used on junction boxes?
 
  #8  
Old 03-07-14, 08:07 PM
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The slots are normally a slotted hole.
 
  #9  
Old 03-07-14, 08:45 PM
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Glad to hear you passed your inspection!
 
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