Electric to barn questions

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  #1  
Old 03-05-14, 08:09 AM
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Electric to barn questions

I know this has been covered before ad nauseum, but I'm looking for some help and let's face it...you're bored

I have a barn that is already wired for electric on the inside (lights, outlets), but has no power running to it. I bought the house/barn from my now neighbor. Originally the barn was hooked up to their house, before my house was built.

So I need to run power from my house panel to the barn. The barn will need a new subpanel. The run is 200' +/- for calculation sake.

In the house:
150A Main Panel
Hot Water tank is gas, boiler is gas (hot water heat)
Kitchen appliances are on electric. Will most likely be switching to gas in a remodel down the road.

My questions are as follows:
What steps do I take to figure out what size breaker I can run out to the barn?
Once that's done, I can probably look up myself the gauge of wire. It's gonna be run this summer in conduit to the barn. A second opinion would be appreciated.

I plan on running basic power tools out there. Chop saws, drills, etc. If I could do a light duty welder, that would be great, but is not a necessity. Anything else you guys need? Attached are pics of the panel
 
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Old 03-05-14, 08:16 AM
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From what you describe a 60 amp feed to the barn should be enough if the welder input is 30 amps or less. Might even squeak buy with a 40 amp welder if nothing else on at the same time. Does the barn already have a subpanel? If so post a picture.

Best to use insert image not attach document to include a picture. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...-pictures.html
 
  #3  
Old 03-05-14, 09:57 AM
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Barn

Here is general layout. Your feeder can be in conduit or direct burial with conduit risers at each end. I would figure voltage drop on 50 amps for a 60amp feeder as you are typically not at full capacity under normal use.

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Old 03-05-14, 10:40 AM
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Ray, how did you figure 60a breaker? Just for my own knowledge.

I'm going to run in conduit just in case I ever need to add something else out there. Trying to plan a little bit for the future.

Here is the current barn panel. It's getting replaced. Really it should just be lights and outlets. And power tools so I don't have to drag them out into my attached garage through the snow in the winter.

 
  #5  
Old 03-05-14, 12:00 PM
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Ray, how did you figure 60a breaker
Based on what you wrote including
Really it should just be lights and outlets. And power tools so I don't have to drag them out into my attached garage through the snow in the winter.
No mention of 240 volt power tools so assumed 120 volt power tools. Max amps are usually 12 or less. Lights probably less then 5 amps. If only one power tool at a time probably one 20 amp 120 circuit would be enough. A 30 amp 120/240 sub panel can supply two 20 amp circuits easily with power left over. I then added 30 amps for a welder. I didn't factor in heat or AC because you didn't mention them.

I would suggest a 12 or 20 space 100 amp main breaker panel. You will have plenty of room for breakers and the included main breaker will serve as the requires disconnect switch. You will need to add a ground bar also and install at least one ground rod at the barn. #4 copper at 200 feet will give you a more than acceptable voltage (2.6%) drop at 200 feet/50 amps. #8 for your ground conductor.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-05-14 at 01:37 PM.
  #6  
Old 03-05-14, 12:18 PM
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#4 copper at 200 feet will give you a more than acceptable voltage (2.6%) drop at 200 feet/50 amps.
The calculator I use says
1 conductors per phase utilizing a #4 Copper conductor will limit the voltage drop to 2.40% or less when supplying 50.0 amps for 200 feet on a 240 volt system.
That sounds very tolerable for your needs.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-05-14 at 01:36 PM. Reason: Correct my typo in quote.
  #7  
Old 03-05-14, 12:19 PM
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Awesome. Truly appreciate the help.
 
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Old 03-05-14, 12:41 PM
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You're welcome. Good luck with your project.
 
  #9  
Old 03-10-14, 07:56 AM
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Any qualms running aluminum instead? Bump it up to 2 gauge and a 4 gauge ground...

Something like this auction:

225' Aluminum URD Dyke 2 2 2 4 Cable Direct Burial Quadruplex Secondary Wire | eBay


Also, I should be running quadplex, correct? I have had a few different opinions that I "could" run triplex and just ground at the barn. That's not the correct way to do it is it?
 
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