Adding a Breaker Panel

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  #1  
Old 03-07-14, 01:31 AM
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Adding a Breaker Panel

Hello Everyone, Just signed up.

I am wanting to install a panel on my power pole. The pole has a transformer on it that feeds down to the meter, then to the 200 amp cutoff panel. From the cutoff the cable goes straight into a conduit and underground.

I am wanting to install this: Connecticut Electric 60 Amp RV Panel with 50 Amp Receptacle, Breakers & GFCI Duplex-CESMPSC55GRHR at The Home Depot

at the cutoff location to feed my RV.

Just looking for thoughts on how this should be done properly.

Thanks!

Bill
 
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  #2  
Old 03-07-14, 02:35 AM
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Does your "cutoff panel" have room for another 2-pole circuit breaker or perhaps "feed-through" lugs? I'm not sure that you could even use the feed-through lugs from a 200 ampere panel into a 50 ampere panel, the electricians would have better knowledge of that.
 
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Old 03-07-14, 06:12 AM
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I'm not sure that you could even use the feed-through lugs from a 200 ampere panel into a 50 ampere panel,
The tap rule might allow a second breaker box from the disconnect if it has feed through lugs.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-07-14 at 09:30 AM.
  #4  
Old 03-07-14, 06:47 AM
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I'm too lazy to look it up and I'm going to bed in a few minutes but as I recall a tap must be at least one-third the amperage of the line being tapped. For a 200 ampere CB that would mean the tap would have to be at least 66 amperes. This is a 50 ampere panel.
 
  #5  
Old 03-07-14, 08:07 AM
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And my knowledge is even less so time to wait for the pros. However if that is the case my guess is you could skip the special purpose panel and just use a 100 amp main breaker panel and a 50 amp receptacle. It might even be cheaper.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Square-D-...MVP5/100197589
GE 50 Amp Temporary RV Power Outlet-U054P at The Home Depot
 
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Old 03-07-14, 08:59 AM
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Here is a quick overview of the tap rules. Note that this article if from June 2002, but I don't believe there have been any substantial changes.

Understanding the Rules for Feeder Taps | Code Basics content from Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine

I think the 10 foot feeder tap rule would apply.

10-ft feeder tap rule [240.21(B)(1)] � You don't have to install an OCPD at the tap point of a feeder tap if its length doesn't exceed 10 ft and if it meets the following requirements (Fig. 1 above):

The ampacity of the tap conductor is not less than the computed load in accordance with Art. 220, and not less than the rating of the device supplied by the tap conductors or the OCPD at the termination of the tap conductors.


The tap conductors aren't extended beyond the equipment they supply.


The tap conductors are installed in a raceway if they leave the enclosure.


The tap conductors have an ampacity of no less than 10% of the ampacity of the OCPD from which the conductors are tapped.
 
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Old 03-07-14, 09:17 AM
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Of course first we must know if (ideally) there is space for more breakers in the disconnect panel or if not feed through lugs. Carterw65 can uou post a picture of the disconnect with the cover off? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html Of course you could also do a tap off the cables from the disconnect breaker also.

Joe, I am reading
The tap conductors have an ampacity of no less than 10% of the ampacity of the OCPD from which the conductors are tapped.
As meaning #6 to a 60 amp panel would be acceptable. Is that correct?
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-07-14 at 09:32 AM.
  #8  
Old 03-07-14, 06:20 PM
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Joe, I am reading



The tap conductors have an ampacity of no less than 10% of the ampacity of the OCPD from which the conductors are tapped.
As meaning #6 to a 60 amp panel would be acceptable. Is that correct?
That would be allowable by the way I read it too Ray, but so would a #12 tap conductor (20 amps is 10% of the 200 amp rated OCPD). That would be the minimum size allowed by the way I read it. The question would be, is there enough room inside the enclosure to install tap connectors? I seriously doubt there'll be enough room inside the enclosure for tap connectors.

Carterw65 can uou post a picture of the disconnect with the cover off?
Yes, we need to see a picture.
 
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Old 03-07-14, 06:45 PM
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Joe, could split bolts (probably need to be Cu/Al) be used as taps?
 
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Old 03-07-14, 07:50 PM
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Kind of round about, but why not run the circuit from the panel back through the conduit and then go to the receptacle? The breaker would be in the house panel.
 
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Old 03-08-14, 09:04 AM
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Joe, could split bolts (probably need to be Cu/Al) be used as taps?
Yes, but those would require a lot of space to install. In a situation like this, I'd recommend insulation piercing tap connectors, but the available space may not be sufficient for these either if the OP has just a typical NEMA 3R enclosure for a 200 amp breaker. Something like this is what I was thin king of.

https://www.mrsupply.com/ilsco-insul...ipc-4-0-6.html

If not enough room, the breaker enclosure could be replaced with a 200 amp panel with feed-thru lugs and breaker space to add a 60A 2Pole breaker.


Kind of round about, but why not run the circuit from the panel back through the conduit and then go to the receptacle? The breaker would be in the house panel.
This would definitely work, but I believe it would be pretty difficult to get the circuit back through the existing conduit.
 
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