Bids, Estimates AHJ's and inspections?

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Old 03-08-14, 04:25 PM
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Bids, Estimates AHJ's and inspections?

"All work to conform to current code requirements of the applicable jurisdiction"

That's what it is says on a bid I got for electrical work. Does that mean if the work doesn't pass an inspection, it is on the electricians dime that it meets code? Or in other words, if something isn't up to snuff with the AHJ, does a "bid" or "estimate" change? To what extent is a homeowner on the hook for code compliances?

Also if an electrician touches or alters something not associated with the estimate (perhaps in the realm of service work) and later it doesn't pass an inspection.. are they liable for correcting it?

Probably hard questions to ask... just curious as I am in the process of having my first permitted electrical job in my home and I am unclear of how the process works.
 
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Old 03-08-14, 05:09 PM
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Any work related to the contract that does not meet the code should be on the contractor the fix correctly.

Others will probably be extras.
 
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Old 03-08-14, 05:16 PM
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As pcboss said...if they are licensed and it's a permitted job...then it's all on them to meet code.

If, in the process of doing the contracted work, they find something that has to be changed or should be changed...then as said...that will be extra.
 
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Old 03-08-14, 07:54 PM
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Those weren't hard questions at all.

To what extent is a homeowner on the hook for code compliances?
To be on the safe side, I always recommend the homeowner not pay the final bill till the work has passed inspection.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 02:07 PM
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If, in the process of doing the contracted work, they find something that has to be changed or should be changed...then as said...that will be extra.
Since the additional work was discovered during the course of work being done under a contract, it is often in the client's best interest to negotiate a change order to the original contract to cover the specs and specify the cost of the additional work.

Minor changes can be done with a handshake, but that contract and any change orders exist to protect you more than to protect the contractor, so think for a bit before agreeing to let something -- anything -- be done that isn't covered in it.

Remember, for example, that that "Meets Code" provision in the contract only covers the work specified in the contract.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 02:51 PM
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are electricians married to the stuff they touch. In other words, if they are replacing a panel are they responsible for malfunction down the road?

Or say while completing contracted work, they touch some other aspect of the electrical system... is it their responsibility now if something malfunctions?

How about bringing stuff they touch up to code?? Say an overfilled box or a not properly grounded box?
 
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Old 03-09-14, 04:45 PM
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Many areas require a warranty period. One year seems to be common.
 
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Old 03-09-14, 08:33 PM
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are electricians married to the stuff they touch
Not necessarily.

if they are replacing a panel are they responsible for malfunction down the road?
One year is a common warranty for labor and most materials supplied by the contractor. Square D QO series and Cutler-Hammer CH series, for example, both have a lifetime warranty on both loadcenters and breakers. Within the first year, the contractor should handle that equipment warranty for you.

How about bringing stuff they touch up to code?? Say an overfilled box or a not properly grounded box?
That's extra work. You usually can either sign an extra ticket or ask for a change order. The formal change order could easily delay a relatively small project by at least an extra day because they usually come from the contractor's office.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 05:42 AM
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Hi thanks for your responses.

Heres a specific scenario.

Contracted work was to change panel. In order to do so they had to pull some new wire. One of the points they were pulling from was an overfilled junction box in my basement. When they were done in that box, the guy added a box extension to the overfilled box. However, according to the NEC chart, I am still over by 5 or 6 conductors.

Is it the contractors responsibility at that point to change the box? And say they pulled thru or made splices in other overfilled boxes, should they have changed the boxes when doing so?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 07:45 AM
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Is it the contractors responsibility at that point to change the box? And say they pulled thru or made splices in other overfilled boxes, should they have changed the boxes when doing so?
They possibly should have either changed the box or added an extension which increases the capacity of the box. Although this may be extra work, it is still part of the job they looked at and proposed to complete for a set amount. I believe that in most cases there should be no extra cost for this extra work because the contractor had the opportunity to see what was involved before bidding the job.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 08:02 AM
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In this case they added extension rings. However, even with the extension the boxes are still slightly overfilled. Should I make issue of this?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 01:49 PM
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Another extension ring could be added if the conductors are long enough. How many and what size are the conductors in the box? What type and size of box? Can you post a pic?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 01:55 PM
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So your saying they could just add a second box extension? Isnt that like putting a bandaid on a bigger issue?

Im not sure of the specifics but my husband says after the extension box was added, its still overfilled by 6 or 7 wires.

Is this something we should make an issue of while they are finishing up the new service and moving onto the inspection phase?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 02:16 PM
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If you haven't had the inspection the inspector should catch it if it is a violation. Multiple rings are often used.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 02:40 PM
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That's my question, if the inspector see something like that (something that wasn't written into the proposal but was done in the process of completing the work) is it up to the contractor to fix or will they be telling me they can fix it for time and material or like a service call?
 
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Old 03-10-14, 05:16 PM
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That's my question, if the inspector see something like that (something that wasn't written into the proposal but was done in the process of completing the work) is it up to the contractor to fix or will they be telling me they can fix it for time and material or like a service call?
I suspect they'd just add another extension ring and be done with it. I'd just wait and see what the inspector says.
 
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Old 03-10-14, 07:53 PM
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The inspector does care a bit about the contract/proposal and who is responsible for what.

He is just there to determine the job meets the code and not be a referee. It has to be done right and do not offer any opinions and details when he is there.

I hope your electrician is licensed, since that goes a long way with the inspector. Inspectors do not like dealing with poor work and licensed electricians do not want a record for poor jobs if they want to keep busy in the future.

Dick
 
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