Wiring a Hard-Wired Water Pump to a Plug Connector

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  #1  
Old 03-10-14, 05:59 PM
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Wiring a Hard-Wired Water Pump to a Plug Connector

Hello, I'm trying to install an RV water pump into a food trailer and am a real beginner when it comes to electrical stuff. I will try my best to describe my question.

Right now I've got a water pump that is intended to be hard-wired. The food trailer that I'm going to install it in only has standard three-prong plug outlets though for power.

I went ahead and bought a plug connector at Home Depot (pictured below) that can take up to 15 Amps and 125 Volts. The water pump is rated at maximum 7 Amps, 12 Volts.

My main question is about the wiring. The water pump has only two wires, but most of the power cords I see at Home Depot have 3 or more wires. What would be the recommended way of hooking up the water pump into a plug outlet? Could I buy a small power cord from Home Depot and just ignore the unused wires?

Thanks in advance

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  #2  
Old 03-10-14, 06:33 PM
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Water Pump

First of all the cord cap you purchased is 125v 15amps and not 12V dc. just where are you planning on "plugging" this into???? The RV water pump is 12V Dc, so I assume the trailer has a 12V circuit designated for the pump where you can make your connection? Do not plug the pump supply into one of the 120V receptacles. does the trailer have a panel like in most RV's where there are breakers for the 120V loads and fuses for the DC loads?
 
  #3  
Old 03-11-14, 04:38 AM
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bahtah, yes there is a panel in the trailer but all I see are breakers. Picture is below. From what you're saying, I think I understand that I'll need something like a transformer to plug in the 12v water supply into the 120v load. Please advise, thanks

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  #4  
Old 03-11-14, 05:00 AM
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Look into a 120 volt ac to 12 volt dc power supply.
 
  #5  
Old 03-11-14, 06:43 AM
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Is the orange cord supplying power to the panel? If so, you do not have a neutral.

The NEC does not cover wiring on vehicles, but if it did there are violations like the missing connectors that I would address. I also don't like the flex cord as a wiring method.
 
  #6  
Old 03-11-14, 08:46 AM
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I would suggest cleaning up the existing cord connections as stated by pcboss. Also, instead of buying a power supply I would buy a 115V pump. Here is a link:

Shurflo Pump - 115 Volt on Sale - PPL Motor Homes
 
  #7  
Old 03-11-14, 09:51 AM
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A 12 volt pump run at 10x the voltage it is made for will let the smoke out.
 
  #8  
Old 03-11-14, 10:26 AM
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Pcboss, I am not sure if the orange wire supplies power or not. What I can tell you is that there are two power cords that come from the 120V/240V plug outlet from the generator outside. One is the yellow one and the other orange. They both come in through the bottom in the picture I posted of the panel.

I severely lack the knowledge to clean the wiring up myself but will ask a few electrician friends if they can help make it agreeable to the NEC.

As for switching pumps for a 115V pump; what is the tradeoff compared to finding a 120VAC to 12VDC power supply? To me that seems easier.
 
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Old 03-11-14, 10:28 AM
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The only trade off is you can't use it without shore power or the generator.
 
  #10  
Old 03-11-14, 12:40 PM
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All the conductors should be in one cable. It sounds like you are saying there are two cable feeding the panel. It looks like the orange contains the tow hot while the yellow cord has the neutrals and ground. If so it is very wrong.
 
  #11  
Old 03-12-14, 07:50 AM
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Pcboss, how do you discern which wires are neutral and which are hot by the configuration of the breakers and wires? Please excuse my noob-ness
 
  #12  
Old 03-12-14, 08:28 AM
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how do you discern which wires are neutral
They should be white or gray. Configuration helps too. They should be on the insulated neutral bar.

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  #13  
Old 03-12-14, 08:55 AM
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The lugs on the right side are for the two hots.
 
  #14  
Old 03-12-14, 08:57 AM
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Ah okay, I'm understanding a little more now. But why is this configuration so wrong?
 
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Old 03-12-14, 09:17 AM
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That is a huge safety hazard there with those cables separated.

The food trailer I wired had a separate 12V system for the pump, trailer lights, and some convenience lights for general use, refilling tanks, starting generator, etc.

If I had my laptop I'd show you some pictures.
 
  #16  
Old 03-12-14, 06:55 PM
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Food Trailer

Some pictures of the electrical installation (generator, how the cords are run) would be helpful in trying to improve the installation. If you have no 12V battery and system, the 120V pump will be easier to install. A converter to run your pump without a battery will need to be sized to handle the load all by itself and is just one more item for maintenance.
 
  #17  
Old 04-07-14, 05:08 PM
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I went ahead and bought a 115 VAC powered water pump. Just got back from Home Depot with a 125V replacement cord. I did some research and it seems that using a 125V cord with a 115VAC appliance shouldn't be an issue; 125V is just the maximum amount of power the cord can handle. Thanks to everyone for all the help!
 
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