adding some additional outlets

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Old 03-12-14, 06:55 AM
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adding some additional outlets

Hi - I have a couple electrical projects I want to do and need some advice.

The first is to add 3 or 4 outlets and a light/switch in my garage. After browsing the forum, I see that adding a new 20 amp GFCI breaker, and using 12-2 wire would be by best option? If so, will the plugs and switch need to be 20 amp?

The next thing is to add exterior outlets in the front and rear of the house. I was thinking that I could connect to the interior outlets on the opposite side of the wall. Is this ok to do? The exterior walls are concrete block, so I would drill a hole for the wire and mount the new box on the exterior. These are both bedrooms and are on 15 amp circuits. Assuming this is ok to do, I would use 15 amp GFCI outlets. The one in the front would be used for landscape lighting, and the one in the rear would be used for a small pool pump.

Thanks
 
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Old 03-12-14, 08:42 AM
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Assuming the garage is attached your plan is good but I wouldn't use a GFCI breaker. If you use a GFCI receptacle as the first receptacle instead it is usually cheaper than a breaker plus since the lights don't need GFCI you aren't left in the dark if you trip the GFCI.

I was thinking that I could connect to the interior outlets on the opposite side of the wall. Is this ok to do?
So long as the interior receptacles aren't on restricted circuits or heavily loaded circuits that is fine. Examples of restricted circuits are dinning room, kitchen, bath.
 
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Old 03-12-14, 09:28 AM
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Yes the garage is attached. I will go with the GFCI receptacle.

It is possible that a bath is on the same circuit as the rear bedroom, but I'm thinking it is separate. I will need to check.

Thanks!
 
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Old 03-12-14, 09:33 AM
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If the house is less than ten years old then the bath receptacles should not be on the bedroom circuit. However it is okay for the bathroom lights only to be on the bedroom circuit. Bathroom lights are not restricted so if only the lights you can use a bedroom receptacle.
 
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Old 03-13-14, 06:08 AM
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The house is 13 years old. I checked and the baths have separate circuits for the gfci receptacles and the lights, and the bedroom is on its own circuit as well. So I should be good to go.

Just curious, when I was looking at my breaker box, I noticed that there is one single pole 20 amp breaker that has 2 small switches instead of the one. One labeled refrigerator and the other labeled gfci on counter. What is the purpose of that kind of breaker compared to the "normal" one?

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Old 03-13-14, 06:30 AM
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It is a tandem. It allows you to put two 120 volt breakers in the space of one breaker.
 
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