Wiring a shed: need confirmation of plan

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-13-14, 07:04 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wiring a shed: need confirmation of plan

Wiring a shed located about 50 feet from back deck. Want a light and a few receptacles. This will be used for small items; I realize I need something bigger for heaters, AC, or other bigger power users. Currently using an extension cord plugged into outside receptacle at deck as I only need power occasionally. So for now, I will continue to go this route but want to wire the shed now for eventually running permanent power to it (as I will be adding paneling soon).

I'm not knowledgeable in wiring so want to verify what I've come up with based on various internet research.

Power comes in to shed. From there, into GFCI outlet. Here I want to split into two different paths, one to a light switch and the other to two other outlets. To do this, I will wire-nut together two sets of wire to the set coming off the GFCI outlet (thus, 3 hots together, 3 grounds together, 3 neutral together). I will put this in a junction box.

Now I will send one of these to a light switch then to the light fixture. The other I will send to an outlet and then on to another outlet. There is will end.

I'm using 14/2 Romex cable. All outlets and switch is 15a.

EDIT: forgot to add this - for the switch, I understand the hot is connected and the neutral bypasses; for the outlets, the hot are connected to the brass posts and the neutral to the silver. Confirmation that this is correct would be helpful too.

Is there anything inherently wrong with this setup?

ADDITIONAL QUESTION: one other thing I'd like to do until permanent power is installed is to add an inlet and wire that to the GFCI outlet so I can just plug the extension cord into the inlet and use the various outlets rather than a power strip like I'm doing now. Is there a problem with doing this?

Thanks for any help you can provide.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-13-14, 07:45 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,997
Received 40 Votes on 35 Posts
First thing is that NM cannot be used outside. Second, I would not waste time in installing a 15 amp circuit when for only slightly more you can install a 20 amp and get 1/3 more capacity. A multi-wire branch circuit will give you twice the power.

A means of disconnect is required. For a single circuit this can be as simple as a toggle switch.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-14, 08:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
"...NM cannot be used outside..."

This would be inside the shed. Because it is an unattached structure, is that considered as "outside?"
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-14, 09:05 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
NM-b can be used inside the shed but how did you plan to get power to the shed? NM-b can not be used to run power to the shed. You need to use either direct burial cable such as UFb or conduit with individual conductors.
 
  #5  
Old 03-13-14, 10:03 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, I know wiring to the shed will be different. That will be done much later. I'm just wiring the inside right now. Getting it set up so I can install wall paneling.

So is my understanding of how to connect things appropriate? Can anyone advise on that?

Thanks.
 
  #6  
Old 03-13-14, 10:36 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Power comes in to shed. From there, into GFCI outlet.
No, a disconnect is required. If the feed is 20 amps a heavy duty single pole "light switch" rated 20 amps can be used. It could be in a double gang box with the first receptacle or in a separate single gang box. The lighting does not need to be GFCI protected. After the disconnect switch the power would split to the lighting circuit and the line side of the GFCI. Subsequent receptacles would be connected to the load side of the GFCI. They should be non GFCI receptacles.

Name:  ShedWiringBasic.jpg
Views: 12489
Size:  21.0 KB
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-13-14 at 01:07 PM.
  #7  
Old 03-13-14, 11:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, thanks so much.

I hope this is my last question: I've read that having multiple GFCI on a single circuit is a no-no. Is that right? And, somewhat related yet unrelated, are exterior receptacles at the front and back of the house GFCI? I don't see the middle "reset button" like I do with the ones in my garage, but I would assume since they are outside they must be. This is a house that was built in 2000.

Thanks again.
 
  #8  
Old 03-13-14, 11:28 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I've read that having multiple GFCI on a single circuit is a no-no. Is that right?
Yes.
are exterior receptacles at the front and back of the house GFCI?
To be code compliant, yes but they could be protected by a GFCI breaker or GFCI receptacles elsewhere and therefore be non GFCI receptacles.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: