Re-Wiring Best Practices

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-13-14, 10:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Re-Wiring Best Practices

Hello,

New to the DIY forum here and was hoping to get some professional advice from someone out there.

My house is a ranch that was built in 1955 and expanded upon in 1995... essentially doubling the size. For the addition they ran a sub-panel into the main panel, and all of the wiring to the addition appears to be done as most new houses are where all lights/outlets of a given room going to the same breaker.

The original half of the house is a different story though. It is using legacy 2-wire copper (hot/neutral only), and it seems to be installed on a outlet or fixture basis. What I mean by this is that all of bedroom/hall/bathroom lights appear to be going to one breaker (and run from the attic) while all of the outlets appear to be going to another breaker (and run form the crawl space). It is the same for the kitchen/dining/living room, and this can be rather confusing when you need to turn off power to a certain area. In addition to this I'm finding that a lot of older cable is run to locations that don't necessarily have anything in place, and my guess is that it was left in place when they did the addition and possibly removed some exterior fixtures. While I'm doing my best to make sure the panel is properly marked, I was hoping to eventually re-wire the original half of the house with 3-wire grounded cabling... and do it on a room-by-room basis instead.

My question for everyone here is do you see any reason why I should keep the wiring on the same schema it is today, or is it really just a matter of preference?
I'm well aware that I need to take any possible loads into consideration when re-wiring a given room, but I wasn't sure if anyone had any reason why I should wire this one way or the other.

Thanks in advance!
Mike
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-13-14, 10:45 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 46,255
Welcome to the forums.

My personal preference is to put the lighting in several rooms on one circuit. Then the receptacles in each room go on their own circuit.

The reason for this is if you plug something in and trip the circuit or it trips from overload..... you aren't in the dark.
 
  #3  
Old 03-13-14, 10:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 4
Cool, thanks for the quick reply! I definitely like the convenience of not having an entire room go dark, but I on the other hand I was hoping to keep things the original section and the addition.

I also wasn't sure if putting all the lights (or outlets) on one breaker was common in the 1950s but looked down upon today. Most new houses I've seen seem to do things on a room by room basis.

I'm guessing it's really up to your preference as long as you keep everything else within code.

Thanks again!
 
  #4  
Old 03-13-14, 11:38 AM
PJmax's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Northern NJ - USA
Posts: 46,255
I live in a house built in 1958. The lights and receptacles were all on the same circuits. The house was originally wired with a whopping 9 circuits.

I had been particularly impressed with one circuit. The panel is in the garage. The circuit went straight up to a bedroom and picked up two receptacles and the ceiling light. Then it jumped over the next bedroom and picked up the bathroom light. Then it picked up two receptacles in the living room, the outdoor lights controlled at the front door, the kitchen and dining room lights and it finally landed behind the refrigerator in the kitchen.
 
  #5  
Old 03-14-14, 03:21 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,399
The house prior to the one I now have originally had a 60 ampere service with a 60 ampere main pull-out fuse block, an additional pull-out for the kitchen range and four screw-in fuses. Two of those fuses were for the water heater so that house had a whopping TWO branch circuits. The house had been built in 1953 and we bought it in the summer of 1977. Upgrading the service was the first major project I did in that house.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes