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Problem with electrical heating lamp project - help needed

Problem with electrical heating lamp project - help needed

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  #1  
Old 03-18-14, 09:22 AM
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Post Problem with electrical heating lamp project - help needed

Hi, I'm new to this forum. I'm stuck on a DIY project and would like to seek help from you guys.

Basically what I'm trying to do is to create an enclosed heating machine. The heating elements are two heating lamps, each with a power rate of 550w (total power for two lamps=1100w). They are connected to a controller that determines the target heating temperature and duration. The problem I'm facing is that when I connect this whole assembly via a plug to an electrical outlet, it trips the entire circuit breaker in my house. It didn't have the chance to heat up, not for a second.

To better understand what I'm trying to convey, please see the attached diagram. Could anybody point out what changes I should do to make this thing work? I am at my wits' end and couldn't figure out anything. My knowledge about electrical and electronics are limited as I didn't finish school (although I still managed to pick up something after leaving school).

Please enlighten me. Thanks!

In the diagram:
On/Off - controlled by a knob
SSR - 25A
Electrical outlet - 16A
Voltage - 240V

P.S. If anything's unclear, please point out. I will try to clarify.
 
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  #2  
Old 03-18-14, 09:44 AM
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Does your controller require an external DC power supply or does it create the + and - shown on terminals 11 and 12 and for the temp probe? Is the voltage output from the controller appropriate for the SSR?
 
  #3  
Old 03-18-14, 10:31 AM
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Location: New England
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Remove your heat lamps and see if the circuit will power up by itself. I'm concerned about your experience level, as you stated, since anything electrical is not only a hazard to you, but a fire hazard.

I also don't see any fuses.

Bud
 
  #4  
Old 03-18-14, 10:32 AM
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Hi Pilot Dane, the controller doesn't require external DC power. And yes, it creates the + and - for terminals 11, 12, and the temp probe. However, I'm not quite sure if the voltage output from the controller is appropriate for the SSR. Please see the attached picture. I got this controller from China, and the picture is a portion of the very brief manual that came with it. I hope it has the info you are looking for...

Any idea what I'm missing or have done wrong?
 
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  #5  
Old 03-18-14, 10:59 AM
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Do you have a list of what each contact 1 - 14 is/does or how are they labled?

#3 says a passive contact which makes me think it is a dry contact. It does not provide power but can handle up to 250 volts, 5 amps.
 
  #6  
Old 03-18-14, 11:55 AM
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Hi Pilot Dane, correct me if I misunderstood you. I think in the previous image, the numbers 1-7 within the list do not correspond to the numbered contacts shown in the first diagram. I believe they are just numbered items that provide technical information of the controller.

Please see the attached picture below. It displays several standard connection diagrams (which are all drawn by the manufacturer). I'm using the XMTD model (name framed in black box). As you can see, the actual connection of my heating machine is almost identical to the XMTD standard connection diagram, except that I didn't link #8 and #9 to an alarming device.

------

Hi Bud9051, many thanks for your concern. I understand your worries about a potential fire hazard, and I have exercised extra caution when fiddling with this whole thing. There is a fuse, it's within the power cord. My apologies for not stating it.
 
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  #7  
Old 03-18-14, 03:37 PM
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Try disconnecting the controller completely from the circuit and using a small battery to energized the solid state relay. If it works okay then you at least know the problem is in the controller.

If the controller is the fault then try connecting power (only) to the controller and following the instructions set the programming of the controller to do what is needed for your circuit. Add in the thermocouple and test the controller to see if it does what you want and then finally add the control circuit to the SS relay.
 
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