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help needed with problematic wiring 110v/220v no ground and/or other problems

help needed with problematic wiring 110v/220v no ground and/or other problems

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  #1  
Old 03-18-14, 02:57 PM
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Exclamation help needed with problematic wiring 110v/220v no ground and/or other problems

this home was remodeled from the ground up about 12 years ago. with help of prior experiences work/electricians aid and a few fires from faulty aluminum wires the remodel was mainly replacing the pre-wiring with 14/2 copper and bigger breaker box with 20 amp breakers, the 220v part is used some heavy gauge out door wire and some random breakers. with that said

some issues the house has: Isn't grounded the breaker box indoor isn't grounded and the out door main box isn't. just neutral and 2 110v.

over time some things have raised a brow, my fence surrounding the yard put off a nice electrical show one night i stopped using the wire (and never figured out how it made it out to the fence but that seemed to have stopped the show in the rain storm) several times my house has been hit by lightning and apparently the first one the satellite was taken out and the repair guy took apart my makeshift house ground wire. (just noticed now). the roof has been "hot" for sometime (about 4 years since first noticed). but now it's seems everything in the house that's metal is electrified "hot" a few random checks with assortment of electric testers i've found some odd readings like receptacle tester all 3 lights are on and then non-contact ac voltage detector says most things metal are reading some volts and oddly enough my pvc water pipes are also showing readings i'm not sure how to check for a ground or make one to get it indoors

sorry for Grammar errors and bad punctuation, and help would be appreciated. where i live there isn't any code or inspectors and the electric company don't care there is no county inspectors. (i had a appliance failure and needed one to get warranty) i'm not worried so much as a fire as to i'm tired of replacing expensive appliances and getting random shocks not sure if it matters everything in my house is energy star maxed with exception to: dryer (the washer destroys clothes at times but makes dryer time much shorter), and about 4 800 watt computers.

electronics readers.. indoor breaker box
the main outdoor breaker box (just noticed the green ground wire isn't connected and has no place to connect it)






the ground wire on the pole is connected the meter but not the main box (if that is needed) witch both was installed buy the electric company. as to there reqiurments. most everything else was all done by me at some point or time. other flaws to the electrical is mice & lowes cheap 15 amp plug ends I've had to replace some sections over time and plugs and switches. i don't know what else to add. ask any thing i'll be waiting to reply.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 03:42 PM
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The best advice I can give you right now is for you to go buy the book Wiring Simplified and read it cover-to-cover. The cost is less than $10 ($6.95 at my local Home Depot) and it is available at many on-line booksellers as well as most corner hardware stores and also the big box mega-mart homecenters. Usually in the electrical aisle instead of the books and magazines section. Wiring Simplified tells you not only HOW to do it but also WHY it is done in a particular way. In it you will learn why and how equipment grounding conductors are connected differently depending on whether or not there are multiple circuit breaker panels and many other things that are often left out of the home handyman books and yet it is an easy book to read for the layperson.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 03:59 PM
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Go it a loose neutral someplace or someone hooked a ground to a neutral wire.
Hire a real electrician to come look this over before someone gets killed or the house burns down.
This is nothing to put off!
 
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Old 03-18-14, 04:15 PM
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I see electrical work done that didn't include an electrician. All wiring brought into the panels needs connectors. The jacket of the wiring needs to be trimmed at the connectors. I see a ground bar with a heavier green wire in it.

The main panel in the house is technically a sub panel. All the white neutral wires should go to the bars on both of the sides. All the ground wires should go to that ground bar at the top.

At least one ground rod should also be connected to that ground bar in the main panel.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 04:41 PM
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thanks for your reply! and there seems to be many of them from different authors and different years and different companys. is one better than the other. lowes is my only store available and it's a 50 mile one way trip so online would be better

i've looked over and over my set up the only main thing i see is my house's 110's is all 2 wire and my 220's are 3 wire and my breaker box has a neutral and a ground and the shut off is just a neutral so the main shut off at the meteor is 110v 110v and a neutral and i have a green ground that has no plug end.

is it my problem or the electric companys they provided the main shut off and are the only ones that can change it.

it's a $150 fee for them to come out i hate to ask them lol even though the electric is out on the whole neighbor hood at least 3 hours a month. and they come out and look for squirles on the lines so they say.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 05:06 PM
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pjmax witch the main panel the shut off out side? and where does the ground hook too cause the electric company put that in and they didn't seem to think it needed one if so lol should i add one and where would i get one?
 
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Old 03-18-14, 06:40 PM
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cool i found the rod 8 foot copper $10 and $6 for brass plated aluminum clamp any choice wire to use for it? i don't see nothing about the wire. also is it benificial to land a few extra's as to my house gets hit by lightning alot. hehe i stopped buying my dish systems along time ago. let they replace them after i lost my first hd lcd and 501's and fried the coaxal all the way from the antinaa to the house splitter or repeater.
 
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Old 03-19-14, 12:10 AM
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...there seems to be many of them from different authors...
From the link following:
The Late H. P. Richter wrote the first edition of Wiring Simplified in 1932. It was one of the first how-to books on wiring for general readers.

This site has used (older) copies of Wiring Simplified starting at one cent plus postage. Simply do a Google search using Wiring Simplified as the search term.

Wiring Simplified Based On The 2005 National El... | Rent 9780971977907 | 0971977909


Wiring Simplified is updated every three years to coincide with the revisions of the National Electrical Code. Since the original author has died others have taken his place.


Now for some facts that you seem to not be aware of, the main reason why I recommended the book.

The standard voltages in residential usage for at least the last forty years have been 120 and 240. If you live next to the distribution transformer it might be a little higher (the range is +/- 10%) or if you live way out in the sticks it could be a little lower.

Non-contact power indicators only sense the presence of an alternating magnetic field and are notoriously inaccurate fer determining if any real power is present. Most homeowner grade digital meters suffer from a phenomenon known as "phantom voltage" where they appear to measure a voltage, usually something weird such as 67 volts or 149 volts or something far from the expected voltage because of their high sensitivity. In my opinion the BEST electrical tester for the layperson is the solenoid type, often called a "wiggy".

Grounding of electrical power systems is a VERY complex subject and entire books have been written on the subject. Improper grounding CAN be more hazardous than not grounding at all. Before you do anything involving that ground rod (more properly called a grounding electrode) you need to unwind that rat's nest of wires in the outside panel so we can see exactly how everything is connected. BE CAREFUL!
 
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