protective box for PoE switch

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  #1  
Old 03-18-14, 05:25 PM
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protective box for PoE switch

I'm hoping for some advice/comments about the idea of putting this PoE switch box in an outdoor location GeoVision Inc. GV-POE0400 4-Port 802.3at PoE Switch (dimensions shown on Dimensions tab) into a home-made wooden protective cover box, fairly weather-protected, at this receptacle shown on the wall in the following photo:



The switch box (which is about 5x3x1 inches in size) would plugged into the receptacle, and in addition I plan to have a light bulb installed inside the protective box which to be left on during the wintertime to keep temperature inside the box from falling below the minimum operating temperature (32F) for the switch box. The cord to the light bulb would be plugged into the receptacle as well. Five Cat5e ethernet cables would run be running into the protective box to the switch mounted within it.

The wall is vinyl siding over 1/2" plywood. There is an eave overhead which almost always prevents the location from getting very wet during times of heavy rain, although there are the occasional times during wind can be a factor and some wetness will occur.

I'd appreciate any advice in regard to a practical type of protective box, a design that seems reasonable for this purpose including the manner in which I might have it mounted over the receptacle to house the switch/cables and the bulb/cord within. I do happen to have a box (leftover from something else), pictured below, I was thinking of maybe trying to utilize for this purpose. Any/all comments welcome.

 
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Old 03-18-14, 05:46 PM
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I always used a 12*12*6 PVC junction box. Install a receptacle inside the box for the switch.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 05:49 PM
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Generally a bad idea as sooner or later you will have the electronics either wet or otherwise corroded. The receptacle also would need to be changed to an in-use cover to keep the water out. They do make NEMA 3 outdoor boxes with built in heaters if you have the budget.

Better and easier to put the switch in the house and use a 4-gang RJ45 outlet with an in-use cover.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 06:05 PM
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I always used a 12*12*6 PVC junction box. Install a receptacle inside the box for the switch.
If I was to decide to go with that size PVC junction box, what about a heat source though for times when it gets below freezing?
 

Last edited by sgull; 03-18-14 at 07:16 PM.
  #5  
Old 03-18-14, 06:37 PM
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Generally a bad idea as sooner or later you will have the electronics either wet or otherwise corroded. The receptacle also would need to be changed to an in-use cover to keep the water out. They do make NEMA 3 outdoor boxes with built in heaters if you have the budget. Better and easier to put the switch in the house and use a 4-gang RJ45 outlet with an in-use cover.
Right, I'd agree it definitely doesn't seem to make much sense to consider putting such an electronic switch box in an environment where there's going to be moisture/dampness. And I'd like to avoid doing that. But the reason for the apparent need to locate the switch box here, outside, is because of the long CAT5 cable distance (300 ft) between the surveillance cameras outside and the central hub of the system (DVD/PC,etc) indoors.

Also what exactly what is meant by an "in-use" cover as mentioned twice in the response. thanks
 
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Old 03-18-14, 07:12 PM
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Google is your friend. In use cover:

[ATTACH=CONFIG]28539[/ATTACH]
 
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Old 03-18-14, 07:33 PM
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OK thanks TI. So it seems I could probably consider putting the in use receptacle into a PVC box as suggested (probably like the one pictured below) but with the absence of a heat source just plan on having the switch being inoperable during below freezing temperatures. Also, because of it's outdoor location could probably expect the electronics in the switch to corrode sooner or later, as has been mentioned, because of the moisture in the air.

 
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Old 03-18-14, 08:24 PM
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I don't think the cold will bother your Ethernet switch. I've run my laptop, mixer, amplifiers, and all the electronics on the generator in as low as -3F.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 08:48 PM
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So the cold isn't really something I'd need to be worrying about then? Despite the specs for the switch which do say 32F is the minimum operation temperature? There's a few months during wintertime in my area where the temperature stays down below freezing but the rest of the time it's above.
 
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Old 03-18-14, 08:49 PM
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Have you decided on a different camera at this point? Because you don't need to pay for a PoE switch for the ones you asked about before. Any standard switch will do.

You don't need a heater for the switch either. The reason the cameras need heated enclosures is because they are PTZ. The servos that move the camera and zoom the lens get crabby below 0F because the grease in the gearboxes freezes up. It's got nothing to do with the electronic aspect. In fact, the colder it is, the more efficient electronics are. If you had a fixed focus/fixed zoom camera that doesn't move, it doesn't care about the temperature.

I wouldn't worry about the moisture in the air either. When an electronic device is powered on 24/7, it stays warm enough not to condense. And then there's the fact that condensation issues don't affect something outside in the cold.. It happens when you bring something that's been sitting outside, off, stone cold into the warm humid house. That's when moisture condenses on it and can cause issues. That's why if your laptop has been sitting in the trunk all night at 5 below, and you bring it inside where it's 70 degrees and 50% humidity, you MUST wait for it to warm up for a bit before you turn it on.. Water is going to start condensing on all the internal parts immediately.

I buy enclosures from L-com. You would need their stock number NBE141006-KIT03 ($45)

14x10x6 Inch Weatherproof ABS Light-Weight Enclosure with Universal Mounting Plate - NBE141006-KIT03
 
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Old 03-18-14, 09:00 PM
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JerseyMatt the cameras and setup I'm referring to in this thread are for a different area than in my other thread where I was inquiring about the conduit etc. The cameras/setup I'm talking about here are these: Search results - Security Cameras Manufacturer | Security Wholesaler - Veilux.net which do need the PoE switch.

Thanks though for explaining that I needn't be too concerned about the cold or moisture in the air. That is good to know. I'm just wondering about that spec for the switch though, which states 32F minimum operating temperature. Why do they have that specification?

Thanks too for the link to the enclosure. I'll keep that one in mind for sure. thanks!
 
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Old 03-19-14, 07:17 AM
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Probably because being as it is a switch rated 'for indoor use only', they didn't test it much below any temperature extreme that would be found indoors. But trust me, electronics without moving parts don't care how cold it is.
 
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Old 03-19-14, 08:12 AM
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Well I must say it's definitely good for me to hear that neither cold temperatures or moisture in the air will be an issue to worry about. Thanks again.
 
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