New Generator questions

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  #1  
Old 03-21-14, 10:47 AM
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Question New Generator questions

I purchased a 8000 Watt with a 10000 Watt surge generator from Powerland and I want to connect it to a manual transfer switch in the basement. I plan on utilizing the 120/240 50 amp outlet to supply the power to the transfer switch. I plan on powering my well, furnace (nat gas), two 1/2 hp sumps, and freezer and refrigerator at a minimum. I have several questions in regards to this. What size cable do I need from the genset to the outlet for the switch. What would be a good transfer switch to purchase with the output of the genset rated at 8kW. I'm comfortable with installing the box in the house but the outlet on the exterior I'm not sure how to mount it. I also plan to get a tri-fuel conversion for this unit. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you in advance

Here is the link to the generator I purchased.
Powerland 10000 W Gas Generator 16 HP
 
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  #2  
Old 03-24-14, 07:45 PM
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I plan on using a Reliance 50 amp manual transfer switch (10 circuits) with a 50 amp plug. I think I need (6-2 w/ground) wire to run from the plug to the switch. With the same size wire going from the generator to the plug on the outside. Any concerns with doing it this way? I'd really appreciate some feedback.

Switch
Reliance Controls Q510C 50-Amp 120/240V 10-Circuit Transfer Switch w/ Interchangeable Breakers

Plug
Reliance Controls PB50 50-Amp Power Inlet Box w/ Flip-Lid

Exterior cable
Generac 6330 - 50-Amp 10-Foot Generator Power Cord w/ Straight Blade

Tri-fuel conversion kit mentioned in last post
Tri Fuel Propane Conversions & Natural Gas Conversion Kits for Generators
 
  #3  
Old 03-25-14, 04:43 AM
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Check your manual. I don't think you will need 6 gauge wire. It will also call for a 4 wire cable as well. Hot, hot, neutral, ground.
 
  #4  
Old 03-25-14, 06:40 AM
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Personally, with an 8KW generator, I would go with an interlock kit and back feed your whole panel.

This, of course, if you don't live in an anal retentive area that doesn't allow them.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 11:09 PM
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I ordered the cable to connect to the house from the generator already made up. I need to check the requirements for wire size between the Reliance panel and the plug on the outside of the house. Thank everyone for your advice so far!
 
  #6  
Old 03-26-14, 07:56 AM
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the plug on the outside of the house
I think you mean the power inlet. A plug is found on the end of a cord and has male prongs that get inserted into a receptacle.
 
  #7  
Old 03-26-14, 04:00 PM
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I stand corrected. Yes, the power inlet.
 
  #8  
Old 03-26-14, 04:41 PM
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Dean, just to be clear, we refer to a standby power interface such as the one you linked to, the Reliance Controls Q510C 50-Amp 120/240V 10-Circuit Transfer Switch w/ Interchangeable Breakers, as a transfer panel. We reserve the term transfer switch for devices which disconnect your main distribution panel from the utility feed and connect it to your emergency feed. They switch the power source for the entire panel, and do not contain any circuit breakers.

A transfer panel contains branch circuit breakers. It is fed from a 240V breaker in the main panel under normal conditions. The wiring for those loads that will be backed up is disconnected from the breakers in the main panel and fed through the breakers in the transfer panel. When needed, that panel can be switched to disconnect it from the normal feed and connect it to the emergency feed. Those circuits that have been relocated to the transfer panel will receive power from the standby supply until the switch is thrown the other way.

As with all standby power installations, care needs to be taken to insure that no power from the standby source can be placed on the utility supply conductors.
 

Last edited by Nashkat1; 03-26-14 at 05:32 PM.
  #9  
Old 03-26-14, 05:20 PM
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I stand corrected again. So what size of cable do I need to connect the power inlet to the transfer panel. Connecting the transfer panel to the circuits I want to power off the generator is easy since the wire is already supplied by the mfg of the transfer panel. I know I need four wire. (hot, hot, netural, and ground) I'm just not sure of the size of wire.
 
  #10  
Old 03-26-14, 05:26 PM
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6/3 with ground. Or 3 #6's and a #10.
 
  #11  
Old 04-02-14, 06:55 AM
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Thank you for everyone's help. All I need to do is purchase the length of 6-3 wire and get someone to install the inlet on the side of the house. Don't want to screw up the siding. I'm confidant enough to mount and install the transfer switch myself.
 
  #12  
Old 04-02-14, 08:45 AM
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Look at Arlington on line to find mounting blocks for your inlet that match your siding profile.
 
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