Main Panel-Spa panel Breakers

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Old 03-21-14, 07:22 PM
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Main Panel-Spa panel Breakers

I have a feeling that this type of question may have been answered already but have been researching all afternoon and cannot find the info I am looking for so here is my situation/question

I have built a sunroom attached to my house and bought a used hottub to install in said room. (i.e. no outdoor wiring required, just across the basement and through the wall into the sunroom.) I plan to pour a concrete pad under the tub and understand that the rebar must be bonded into the electrical system.

-The tub has a Evolution 240 spa pak which, from what I could tell, is rated as 40 amps. (http://www.aquaspapak.com/manuals)

-I purchased a Connecticut 60 amp Spa disconnect Panel, there was no 40 amps available. (http://www.amazon.com/Connecticut-El.../dp/B0038ZFG12)

The spa panel has a 60a GFCI breaker and comes with an extra 15a circuit for a convenience outlet, deck lighting etc. Being that the tub is inside I want an exhaust fan to run while we are using the tub. Also I am thinking of putting some lighting in the room as well as an outlet or two. According to the advertising for the panel you do not need to run extra wiring from the main box for the 15a circuit so my question is:

If a put a 40 amp breaker in my main panel won't it trip while running the hottub/exhaust fan/lights in my sunroom? If so do I need to run a whole extra circuit for the 15 amp breaker?

If anyone could answer or direct me to an answer I'd sure appreciate it. sorry for the long question but I wanted to put out all the information and hopefully avoid misunderstandings.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 08:13 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

I can't open the .doc file on the site so I will have to take your word about the spa only requiring a 40 amp circuit.

The spa panel you linked is not correct for your installation. There are quite a few 40 amp GFCI breakers available, they just might not be an all in one "spa panel". You could install a sub panel (which is basically what the spa panel is) the same make as a 40 amp GFCI breaker and run a 60 amp feed to that. Then install the GFCI 40 amp breaker for the spa and other breakers for your lighting and receptacles. Just remember to follow the rules of distances between the spa and lighting/receptacles.

If you want, we can make suggestions of what to get for a proper installation if you let us know what stores are available to you, or if you do it online, that works too.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 03-22-14 at 09:30 AM.
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Old 03-22-14, 08:40 AM
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-I purchased a Connecticut 60 amp Spa disconnect Panel, there was no 40 amps available. (Amazon.com: Connecticut Electric SPA260 60-Amps Spa Disconnect Panel with Factory Installed 15-Amps Circuit Breaker: Home Improvement)
I agree with Tolyn, you bought the wrong panel and gave wayyy too much for what you did buy. Can you return it?
 
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Old 03-22-14, 10:23 AM
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I opened the .doc files and they are just wiring diagrams. No specifications listed.
Many 240v spas only require three wires for hookup as a neutral is not needed.
Your unit requires four wires as it does use the neutral.

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Old 03-22-14, 01:55 PM
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Thanks guys
I guess I got confused by the advertising which said for all size hot tubs up through 60 amps. Pretty sure I can't return it cause I bought it over a year ago. To quote the spa pak manual that I have
"the Aqua Spa Pak support systems require the following power supply: Evolution 240volt 1 phase 60Hz 40amp No.8/3 wire"

Could I run a 40amp circuit from the main box through the 60amp GFCI for the tub and an additional 15amp circuit from the main for the lights etc? I realize this means more wiring but it would allow me to use my expensive spa panel and not have to buy a new sub panel and GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 02:16 PM
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If you changed the timer and blower to 240 volts and the pressure switch and thermostat are rated for 240 volts you might be able to use it as a 240 only spa pack. You would use a 40 amp GFCI breaker at the main panel as you suggested and the 60 amp breaker in the spa pack would act as a disconnect only.
and an additional 15amp circuit from the main for the lights etc?
You could run a 120 volt lighting and accessory circuit. However by code you can't borrow a neutral. By code all conductors on a circuit must be in the same raceway (sheath or conduit) so the 120 volt neutral can't be used for the spa pack..
 

Last edited by ray2047; 03-22-14 at 02:40 PM.
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Old 03-22-14, 07:43 PM
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Could I run a 40amp circuit from the main box through the 60amp GFCI for the tub and an additional 15amp circuit from the main for the lights etc?
In trying to salvage your investment in the spa panel, (OPTION #1) I think you could run a 40 amp circuit from your main panel to feed the 60 amp spa panel and the 40 amp breaker would provide the overcurrent protection required while the 60 amp GFCI breaker would provide the GFCI protection. But, you'd have to run separate circuits for your lighting and receptacles from the main panel. That is just my opinion, any other input would be appreciated. (OPTION #2) I believe you could change the GFCI breaker in the spa panel to 40 amps and power both the spa and lights/receptacle from the 15 amp circuit in the spa panel. If you use this option, I'd feed the panel with 50 amps minimum. This is also just my opinion.
 
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Old 03-22-14, 09:41 PM
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As I wrote in the diagram I'm seeing a 120 volt timer and blower. Am I looking wrong?
 
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Old 03-22-14, 09:47 PM
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I also thought of the Option #1 but I kind of wonder if an inspector would let this fly. In theory it should be OK.

Option #2 the only issue is where to get a Connecticut Electric 40 amp GFCI breaker?
 
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Old 03-23-14, 07:43 AM
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Option #2 the only issue is where to get a Connecticut Electric 40 amp GFCI breaker?
Good point. My first though is that it's probably a GE or T&B GFCI breaker, but I now am thinking it's a Siemens Type QF.

http://products.connecticut-electric.com/inventory.asp?CatId={BF695384-82DE-459D-BB87-AE1ED9FF097E}

I cannot get the link to appear as a link, but all I did was Google the catalog number and look for parts.

Without actually looking at the spa panel, it would be impossible to say for sure. There is also a possibility the panel label would indicate what brands are acceptable for use in the spa panel.
 
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Old 03-31-14, 07:05 PM
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I can confirm that the breaker used in the Connecticut 60A SPA260 is, in fact, a Siemens Type QF.
 
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