List of Things Needing Dedicated Circuits?

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Old 03-25-14, 05:38 PM
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List of Things Needing Dedicated Circuits?

Hi,

I mapped out all of the receptacles and fixtures in our house the other day matching them at least to their circuit. It's an older house so it's hard to tell if there was any rhyme or reason behind why some things are on the same circuit and some are not. I'm sure access to the nearest line generally ruled the day for 90% of the receptacles that were installed, despite an unfinished basement. In an effort to see whether some re-balancing of the circuits can be done, does anyone know of (or can anyone provide) a list of things you'll generally find in a house that need dedicated circuits?

I was surprised when a neighbor told me that a gas boiler needed its own dedicated circuit so that set me on this search. I'm assuming some of those same things might apply to my gas stove and gas oven, despite having the huge power demand of a digital clock and electric pilot lights, meaning my Bic fireplace lighting thing can adequately provide the needed power demand.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 05:46 PM
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In case anyone was wondering about my statement "In an effort to see whether some re-balancing of the circuits can be done". My entire upstairs and a third of the first floor are on the same circuit and it regularly trips. In the process of having a new line put in for a window AC that's on that circuit as well, so we'll see if it still trips after that's completed. But I would like to have the second floor more liveable and on a few different circuits and believe some circuits servicing downstairs can be freed to make that happen. The second floor has three bedrooms and a bath. The service box has 20 slots and all are occupied.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 05:47 PM
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The gas oven/range doesn't need to be on it's own circuit.

The fridge is a good idea. Fridge and gas range can share a circuit.
You need two dedicated circuits to the kitchen countertop.
Washer and gas dryer should be on their own circuit.
The bathroom needs a dedicated circuit to it. You can feed the GFI receptacle and lighting in that bathroom if required. Most full baths get wired with their own 20A circuit due to high draw devices like mega blow dryers.

There are other things and others will chime in.

In order to break circuits up for re-feeding. You need to write down what's on each circuit. Since all the circuits start at the panel...... you can follow each circuit, approximate how it's wired and figure out a logical place to break it.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 06:09 PM
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The code changes every 3 years and for the most part is not retroactive. New work should meet the current code requirements. Bathroom receptacles, kitchen countertop circuits and laundry areas have restrictions. Dedicated circuits are more for fixed appliances or convenience.

. Baltimore County does not have homeowner permits.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 06:56 PM
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"Baltimore County does not have homeowner permits." Ha! I wish someone had informed the prior homeowner of that, and I wish our home inspector had seen an eye doctor.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 07:07 PM
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The work sounds like it was done without permits.
 
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Old 03-25-14, 09:16 PM
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Dedicated:
A built-in microwave requires a dedicated circuit.
The dishwasher and the garbage disposal should each be on their own circuits.
All garage receptacles must be GFCI protected and should be on circuits that don't also serve any loads inside the house.
All outside receptacles should be on a separate circuit (may be shared with garage but better practice is separate) and must be GFCI protected.
Receptacles in the attic, crawl space or unfinished basement should be on separate circuits and must be GFCI protected.
The small appliance branch circuits that serve the countertop receptacles must be GFCI protected and must be on two or more dedicated 20A circuits.
The dining room and any other serving/rating area must have two dedicated 20 A small appliance branch circuits. These do not have to be GFCI protected.
All circuits serving the bedrooms, living room, dining room, family room, etc. must be AFCI protected.

Non-dedicated:
Best practice is to run a few 15 A circuits for lighting, and run 20A circuits for receptacles.
Better practice is to feed the receptacles in each room from more than one circuit.
 
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