Wiring Cooktop

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Old 03-26-14, 06:26 AM
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Wiring Cooktop

Quick question...just wanted to double check.

Replaced my old cooktop (4 wire) with a GE that has 3 wire. The feeder from my panel is 4 wire (black, red, white, bare). It's on a bipole 30amp breaker (which is sized correct via manufacturer specs). Out of the cooktop there is a flexible armored cable.

I wired it up via manufacturer install directions. Black to black, red to red, bare grounds together.

Then I installed a metal junction box. It says to cap the white wire in the box. Is this correct? No need to remove it from the panel?

Currently there is no grounding screw in the new junction box. Do I need to get one and add another wire to pigtail the 3 ground wires to the box? If I'm not mistaken, it's grounded to the cooktop currently. I'm just confused how this would work, especially since the ground is bare and there is a metal cable from the cooktop.

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Old 03-26-14, 07:40 AM
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If the cook top is 240 volts only capping the white is appropriate.

The box should be bonded to the ground.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 07:56 AM
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Metal junction box so you need to get a screw and pigtail. Needs to be 10 gauge.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 09:34 AM
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I wired it up via manufacturer install directions. Black to black, red to red, bare grounds together... If I'm not mistaken, it's grounded to the cooktop currently. I'm just confused how this would work, especially since the ground is bare and there is a metal cable from the cooktop.
If one of the conductors in the metal-clad whip from the cooktop is a bare (or green) conductor, then that conductor should be the grounding conductor for the cooktop. It should be bonded to the frame of the cooktop to provide a low-impedance path to ground for faults. When you spliced that conductor to the bare grounding conductor from the panel, you completed that path, given that the bare conductor from the panel is bonded to earth ground in your panel.

If you're asking whether the metal jacket of the whip is a grounding conductor, the answer is "No." The presence of the grounding conductor inside the whip indicates that the manufacturer didn't bond the jacket to the appliance, or it isn't an adequate conductor, or both.

It says to cap the white wire in the box. Is this correct? No need to remove it from the panel?
Yes.
Originally Posted by pcboss
If the cook top is 240 volts only capping the white is appropriate.
It should remain terminated on the neutral bar in your panel. Leaving it connected and capped keeps it ready for use in the future, if and when a 4-wire circuit is needed.

Currently there is no grounding screw in the new junction box. Do I need to get one and add another wire to pigtail the 3 ground wires to the box?
Yes.
Originally Posted by pcboss
The box should be bonded to the ground.
Originally Posted by Astuff
Needs to be 10 gauge.
 
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Old 03-26-14, 10:33 AM
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Thanks everyone. Love this forum
 
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