Glass cooktop wiring question

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-01-14, 08:53 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 2
Glass cooktop wiring question

Good evening,

I just replaced an old, broken Whirlpool cooktop with a nice, shiny new one...the only problem is that it takes FOREVER to heat. I'm wondering if it's a wiring problem that is causing this.

The old one and the new one are both 3-wire, and so is the power supply. The oven has black-red-bare, and the source is black-white-bare. I've connected black-black, red-bare, and bare-white. Is this correct, and if not, would this potentially affect the performance of the appliance?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-01-14, 09:10 PM
Rough Rooster's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 381
It is not correct and definitely affects the performance. Also it is a shock hazard to you.

Connect black - black, red - white, bare - bare. Then test across black and red for 240V. Then check across each color to bare for 120V. That would be correct.

RR
 
  #3  
Old 04-01-14, 09:18 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,587
I am surprised the breaker did not trip when you connected 120 volts to ground.
 
  #4  
Old 04-01-14, 09:32 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2014
Location: USA
Posts: 2
It's funny how well things work when they're wired correctly.... Thanks for the help, guys. You made me look like a pro to my wife...of course I didn't tell her I got help, though. Again, thanks for the assistance.
 
  #5  
Old 04-01-14, 09:33 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
the only problem is that it takes FOREVER to heat. I'm wondering if it's a wiring problem that is causing this.

The oven has black-red-bare, and the source is black-white-bare. I've connected black-black, red-bare, and bare-white.
That'll happen when you connect a 240V appliance to 120V.

Mark the insulation on the white house wire with a bit of electrical tape or permanent marker in any color except gray or green to show that it's being used as an ungrounded )hot) conductor. Disconnect all the wires, separate them so that they wont short out, turn the power on and use a meter to test to make sure you have 120V from each hot wire to the ground wire and 240V between the two hot wires. If you do, turn the power off and connect the wires the way RR said. If you don't, post back and tell us the values you found.

Did you note haw the cooktop you removed was connected? What did the installation instructions that came with your new cooktop say about connecting it to power?
 
  #6  
Old 04-02-14, 08:57 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,096
Reviewing the bidding:

Black to black -- One hot wire for the cooktop was correctly connected to one hot wire of the power source.

Red to bare -- The other hot wire for the cooktop was incorrectly connected to ground. This provided 120 volts instead of 240 to the burners resulting in much slower heating and a much lower maximum heat level.

Bare to white -- !?! The body or frame of the cooktop was energized by the other hot wire of the power source. Since the body is (correctly) not bonded to any of the live wires inside, no high current fault or short circuit occurred whether or not a burner was turned on. But if you touched some metal part of the cooktop and some grounded object such as a nearby sink at the same time, then you could have been electrocuted.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes