How many wires is too many?

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Old 04-07-14, 09:33 AM
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How many wires is too many?

I am looking to install Recessed lighting in my bathroom.
Let me first describe the bathroom. There are two fixtures connected to the same wall switch; a vanity fixture and an exhaust fan that has a light attached to it.
I drilled a hole in the ceiling and found a wire going to the fan. I want to install the recessed lights on either side of the fan. I am planning to cut the wire going to the fan, run wires from both recessed lights and connect them together. I will end up connecting 4 blacks in the same wire connector twist. My question is that too many wires in one connector?

There is no insulation above the the bathroom ceiling, just the floor boards from the room above it. Is there any fire risk to installing the recessed lighting? what do I need to watch for?

These are the recessed lights I am going to use BLIXT Recessed spotlight - IKEA
 
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Old 04-07-14, 09:42 AM
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The wire you are about to cut must have enough slack so that when the ends are brought into a junction box, at least six inches of each extends inside the box past the hold down clamp or finger..

The junction box has to have an exposed cover on the ceiling (or on the floor above).

The number of wires that can go inside one wire nut (marrette; cap) depends on the size and rating of the wire nut itself.

Exception: The junction box that comes with a recessed fixture does not need a hole in the ceiling next to the hole the fixture reflector fits through. But you may not have several cables branching off from this box which is typically sized for just one 14 gauge cable feeding in the power and one 14 gauge cable going on to the next light.
 
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Old 04-07-14, 09:49 AM
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Thanks for the quick reply. I have some basic questions so please bear with me. Am I supposed to use a junction box? if so, where? is that where I should "hide" the connected wires?
 
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Old 04-07-14, 10:05 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

Your two new fixtures and the fan/light combo will be on the same switch..... correct ?

Since the junction boxes on the recessed lights are limited in size..... we try to put no more than two cables in them. You could wire in two ways. Cut the cable going to the fan only if there is enough cable to add in a junction box. From the junction box you run a second line to feed the new lights.

The easiest way to do the wiring is to remove the cable from the fan and connect it to the new light it will reach. Use a short piece of cable to connect the new light to the second light and another short piece of cable to connect the second light back to the fan.
 
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Old 04-07-14, 10:14 AM
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Correct, they will be on the same switch.
I will have only ONE cable going into the recessed light junction box.
I am going to go with your first option because this is a finished bathroom and it is not easy to run wires. I guess what I was missing is the junction box where the connections will be made.
I will cut the fan cable and connect it with the two wires coming from the new fixtures and house the connection inside a junction box. Does that sound correct?
What about fire hazard? Should I worry about overheating given the proximity to the floor boards? There is enough buffer above the recessed light can.
 
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Old 04-07-14, 12:32 PM
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The problem with cutting the cable is that it now needs to be at least 12 inches longer than it was to allow the required amount of free conductor in the junction box.
 
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Old 04-07-14, 12:37 PM
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Im going to get push-in wire connectors to extend the cable
 
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Old 04-08-14, 01:51 AM
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That's fine, as long as those connections are made inside a junction box, and 6" of each wire exist within said junction box.
 
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Old 04-08-14, 11:10 AM
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I am going to go with your first option because this is a finished bathroom and it is not easy to run...
That's understandable. Just don't forget that
Originally Posted by AllanJ
The junction box has to have an exposed cover on the ceiling (or on the floor above).
 
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