Overload or Short


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Old 04-14-14, 11:03 AM
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Overload or Short

Hello again folks,

Woke up today to one area i.e. 3 bedroom and bathroom out of electricity.

Went down to the panel and saw one fuse blown. Went to HD and replaced it. Nothing happened like another blow up etc.

Came back upstairs and switched on the bathroom light and exhaust. Nothing happened.

Went downstairs and saw the fuse blown up again.

Is it overloaded somewhere or short in the circuit. Any other issues that might be for this problem?

Thanks all !
 
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Old 04-14-14, 11:11 AM
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Open the fixtures on the circuit and check for a loose wire.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 12:27 PM
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So basically I open the plug sockets and bulb sockets and find if any wire is loose or touching something.

Or by fixtures you mean items like TV or Lamp etc. What do I look from TV/Lamp outlet that goes into the wall.

Infact it went out suddenly while TV and other things were running as per new information. Things were normal and no one tried to plug something additional that would have overloaded the amps.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 01:05 PM
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Actually you open receptacles, switches, and lights.Fixtures are hard wired things like switches, receptacles, sconces, and ceiling lights that are affixed (usually) to junction boxes.
it went out suddenly while TV and other things were running
Unplug everything on the circuit and try again. If the fuse doesn't blow try plugging in one item at a time till is blows.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 02:27 PM
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Seems like you will be going through several fuses before you find the problem.

Does the fan unit have a built in heater that you really did not want to use and when left on will draw more amperes than you expect and be responsible for blowing the fuse?

Are there other things plugged into the various receptacles on this branch circuit that you did not count (keep track of ) and are still switched on?

When you replaced the fuse and it did not blow as you walked upstairs and was blown when you cam back downstairs, it could mean among other things (1) there was no short until you turned on the bathroom fan and the short is somewhere in the subcircuit after the fan switch or (2) there is a not so low resistance fault (more treacherous as it is still heating up and posing a fire hazard) somewhere that is using up some of the amperes but not so many as to blow the fuse quickly..
 
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Old 04-14-14, 05:59 PM
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The fuse did not blow when I put it in. I went upstairs and switched on bathroom light and fan, nothing happened. So came down to find new fuse blown.

Might take everything out and then connect one by one as advised before.
 
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Old 04-14-14, 06:03 PM
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Sounds like a short. Do you have a meter to check continuity?
 
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Old 04-14-14, 06:34 PM
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I can get a multimeter (if that's what you mean).

Once in hand, how do I check for continuity.

Any links for Electricity ABC guide for a quick start. Thanks.
 
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Old 04-15-14, 08:40 AM
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Seems like you will be going through several fuses before you find the problem.
Try removing the blown fuse and screw in a light bulb. If you have a short to ground or grounded conductor, the bulb will light. When you clear the fault, the bulb will go out.
 
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Old 04-15-14, 09:00 AM
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What's unique about a glass fuse plug is that you can distinguish between a "short" and a "overload" . A "short", which is a large surge of current, causes an immediate melting of the fuse-link which "blackens" the glass; by contrast , an overload causes an gradual rupture of the fuse link.
 
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Old 04-16-14, 08:06 PM
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Red face

Here are the updates:

Removed an old looking GCFI from the bathroom. Then went and bought the reset type fuse (if it blows then reset to be back in business). Somewhere had read that GCFIs create problems in circuits often.

Screwed this fuse in, a small electric cracking like noise, but everything came into business. Both bathroom light and exhaust are back in business. Will replace GCFI tomorrow or might just close it off as they are not used anyways.

Had opened one or two sockets to locate a loose wire in one bedroom, so that room does not have a ceiling light for now but am sure will be back once wires etc. are put back in place.

I think this was a case of an overload.

Thanks a lot for all the inputs !! Cheers !!!
 
 

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