Bring generator cord into basement?

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  #41  
Old 04-23-14, 05:18 AM
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How would you label the outlets?

Theres a junction in the ceiling that leads to the outlets, perhaps it a good idea to mark it.... not sure of the wording I should use to make it look neat.

The only thing that makes it look different than other outlets in my house is that I use grey outlets, used pass Seymour (instead of Leviton) and I used 20A outlets instead of 15.
 
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  #42  
Old 04-23-14, 10:04 AM
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I'd label it something along the lines of "Emergency Power".
 
  #43  
Old 04-23-14, 10:37 AM
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No, because that implies there is a backup power source connected to it.

Mark it "SDS: Generator Inlet"..

SDS = Separately Derived Source. It's a term any inspector should be familiar with.
 
  #44  
Old 04-23-14, 01:32 PM
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Got it, thanks for the help.

I labeled the junction SDS-GENERATOR INLET and labeled the outlet boxes 20A-GENERATOR

Fired it up this afternoon and I am getting my power in the basement albeit high (129 volts AC- no load) hopefully I don't have to mess with the governor here.
 
  #45  
Old 04-25-14, 11:45 AM
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I was telling a coworker about this installation and he said that I made a mistake with using #12 off the 30A twist lock... that it should be #10 and that the 240 twist lock is protected by a 30A breaker.

Is that the case?
 
  #46  
Old 04-25-14, 12:09 PM
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Number 10 should be used for 30 amp circuits.

Regular receptacle circuits are limited to 20 amps maximum.
 
  #47  
Old 04-25-14, 01:13 PM
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No, your 5000w generator does not have a 30A breaker. On most small (under 7500W) generators the twist-lock receptacle is fed off the same 20A breakers as the 120V receptacles. Only on larger generators will they be protected by a separate 30A breaker.
 
  #48  
Old 04-25-14, 01:46 PM
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Number 10 should be used for 30 amp circuits.

Regular receptacle circuits are limited to 20 amps maximum.
Yes, we know this. But as Jerseymatt points out, there is no 30A circuit (despite the 30A outlet) on a 5500 watt generator.
 
  #49  
Old 04-25-14, 06:13 PM
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Once again this is a special application, so many NEC rules don't apply. TECHNICALLY, according to Table 310.16 the actual ampacity of #12 wire is either 25 or 30A, depending on the wire's insulation rating. NEC 240.4(D) is what limits the breaker size on branch circuits to 15A on #14, 20A on #12, and 30A on #10- which trumps Table 310.16. Since this is not a branch circuit, NEC 240.4(D) does not apply. So if you pulled THHN/THWN-2 conductors with 90C insulation (which it most likely is), it can safely carry 30A.
 

Last edited by JerseyMatt; 04-25-14 at 06:28 PM.
  #50  
Old 04-25-14, 11:36 PM
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For future reference, here's what I've come across in the portable generators I've installed, seen, or otherwise used.

4,000W and below: 15A 240V or 30A 120V.
4500W-5500W: 20A 240V
6,000W and the like: 25A 240V
7,000W-8,000W 30A 240V
10,000W 40A 240V
12,000W 50A 240V
15,000W 60A 240V
Above 15,000W varies greatly depending on manufacturer and purpose.

Keep in mind most portable generators are designed for a power factor of 1, and loads such as motors, tv's, computers, HID, CFL and LED lights, cell phone chargers, etc. Use more VA (volt*amp) than watts and in which case you need to use the VA for calculating your load.
 
  #51  
Old 04-26-14, 08:19 AM
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No I am not an electrician but I know the generators that have a 120 only switch do funny things with the wiring.

Often I believe is that the 2 breakers that are wired for the regular outlets are then both put into parallel for the 120v only outlet. Its the only way these can be wired from the two windings in the gen.

Example: If the gen has two 15 amp breakers for the outlets they then become wired in parallel for the 120v outlet making it 30amp...

Now typically I am not sure if you will see a 120v only outlet on a gen over 5000watts.

And I believe the breakers are often used in parralel for the 240/120 twist lock also...
 
  #52  
Old 04-26-14, 09:41 AM
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The 120/240 switch only affects a 30A/120V 3 pin locking receptacle if present on the generator. Basically its for running a camper/RV. It disables the 240V 4 pin twist-lock because in 120V mode there aren't two separate windings to make the two hot legs anymore.
 
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