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Wiring a sub panel for SPA(220) and Electrical Outlets (110)

Wiring a sub panel for SPA(220) and Electrical Outlets (110)

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  #1  
Old 04-25-14, 09:37 AM
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Wiring a sub panel for SPA(220) and Electrical Outlets (110)

Hello I live in Bakersfield, CA and I was wondering what is the correct way to wire a subpanel for a spa. My main panel is on the complete opposite side of the house. Its about 50 feet from my main panel to where I want to put the spa sub panel. The spa sub panels I see are either 50 or 60 amps, but have a maximum of 125 amps. My questions are.

1. What gauge/type of wire do i need to run from my main panel to my sub panel(through the attic)?
2. Do I just add a 125 amp breaker in my main panel and wire my sub panel through that breaker?
3. What gauge/type of wire do I need to run through the conduit to my outlets.
4. Can I run 220 and 110 through the same conduit?
5. Do i just add a breaker in my sub panel to run the 110 outlets?

I'm sure ill have more questions once I start this project.
Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-25-14, 10:49 AM
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Welcome to the forums!

The spa sub panels I see are either 50 or 60 amps, but have a maximum of 125 amps.
That's a heavy load for any subpanel. Can you post a link to the specifications for your spa, or a picture of the nameplate with the electrical information on it?

My questions are.

1. What gauge/type of wire do i need to run from my main panel to my sub panel(through the attic)?
Three #1/0AWG individual THHN/THWN conductors plus one #4AWG ground for a 125A feed.
2. Do I just add a 125 amp breaker in my main panel and wire my sub panel through that breaker?
Yes. A 125A 2-pole 240V breaker.
3. What gauge/type of wire do I need to run through the conduit to my outlets.
#12AWG THHN/THWN for 20A circuits; #14AWG THHN/THWN for 15A circuits.
4. Can I run 220 and 110 through the same conduit?
You don't have 220V or 110V available. You have a 120/240V system.

You could feed receptacles separately from your main panel, but the required derating of the conductors would result in your having to use larger size wiring.
5. Do i just add a breaker in my sub panel to run the 110 outlets?
Assuming that you're asking about 120V receptacles, that sounds like the better solution.
 
  #3  
Old 04-25-14, 11:02 AM
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I havn't purchased a spa yet, but all of the ones ive seen require either One 50 amp GFCI or One 60 amp GFCI, I also don't know what sub panel I require for a spa and electrical outlets.
 
  #4  
Old 04-25-14, 11:11 AM
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Choose a spa. If you were planning for a 125A feed for one spa and a few receptacles you've probably overestimated the load on the receptacles.

Tell us exactly what you're planning to add, in terms of load, or do a residential load calculation for all that you're adding. We can go from there.
 
  #5  
Old 04-25-14, 12:07 PM
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I'm not finding any load calculator that I can use easily. I am going to be powering a few light, a fan, and a radio + the spa.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 12:18 PM
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One 15 or 20 amp circuit for the radio, fans etc should be fine.
 
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Old 04-25-14, 06:50 PM
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Based on most of the spa's I've installed you'll be running 6-3 w/gr type NM cable for the interior portion of the circuit. Outside portions need conduit with individual conductorss and an insulated ground. It would be best to use a dedicated spa panel that has a 2P50 GFI breaker already installed. Most spas are 240v only but there are a few 120/240 so I always run the three wire to be safe. There are termination points in the spa panel for all four conductors.

Like PCB mentioned...a single 15A or 20A circuit should be plenty for the surrounding area.
 

Last edited by pcboss; 04-25-14 at 07:07 PM. Reason: added additional notes.
  #8  
Old 04-25-14, 07:31 PM
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Pjmax so are you saying run a panel for the spa and another panel for the surrounding area?
 
  #9  
Old 04-25-14, 08:00 PM
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Many spa panels come with a factory installed 50 or 60 amp GFCI breaker and also have room to install another single pole breaker for your other small loads. The specs on your specific spa are needed here. For example, if your spa needs 50 amps, you could feed a 50 amp spa panel (maximum rating of 125 amps) with a 60 amp circuit and have plenty of power for the other loads. Take a look at this one, it has a 50 amp GFCI breaker factory installed.

Midwest Electric Products 50 Amp 240-Volt 240-Watt Non-Fuse Metallic Spa Panel Disconnect with GFI-UG412RMW250P at The Home Depot
 
  #10  
Old 04-26-14, 11:41 AM
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so are you saying run a panel for the spa and another panel for the surrounding area?
A panel for the spa but just a single 20A circuit for the lights and receptacles.
 
  #11  
Old 04-26-14, 06:23 PM
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I would run a feed to one subpanel, either the one Joe suggested or one similar to that, and feed all of the loads for this area from that.
 
  #12  
Old 04-28-14, 09:09 AM
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I think I was going overboard thinking I wanted to run a full 125 amps to that sub panel. Realistically, the spa is going to need a max of 60amps, and the receptacles would need 15-20 amps, just so i have room for expansion I think i want to feed 90 amps. That being said, what gauge wire would i need to run from my main panel to my sub panel. Also with individual strand wire in the attic i would need to run it in conduit correct?
 
  #13  
Old 04-28-14, 09:20 AM
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Also with individual strand wire in the attic i would need to run it in conduit correct?
With individual wires , yes, conduit. Three #3 and one #8 in 1" conduit.
 
  #14  
Old 04-28-14, 10:40 AM
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How would I transition from the main panel to the attic conduit, back down the wall to the sub panel?
 
  #15  
Old 04-28-14, 10:45 AM
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Could I use something like This and just run it in the attic without conduit?
 
  #16  
Old 04-28-14, 11:46 AM
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If you use SER you do not need conduit except as sleeves where it needs protection.
How would I transition from the main panel to the attic conduit,
No transition. The conduit runs to the service panel and is connected using an adapter. The adapter is held in the panel by nuts and the conduit glued into the adapter.
 
  #17  
Old 04-28-14, 01:13 PM
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What would require needing protection? I am going to be running the wire out of the main panel through the attic, inside the wall and out to the sub panel
 
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