breaker/configuration size for subpanel

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Old 05-11-14, 05:59 PM
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breaker/configuration size for subpanel

I have a 200A main panel and am going to add a 60A sub panel. I'll put a new double pole 60A breaker in the main panel and then run my wires to the sub panel from it. At the home center I don't see specific "subpanels" just general load centers.

Do I just use a load center that could also be used as a main panel and install a 60A main breaker in it as well, so that there are actually two 60A breakers before power reaches the subpanel?
 
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Old 05-11-14, 06:28 PM
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Subpanel is common slang that does not appear in the NEC. It is any breaker or fuse panel after the first panel with a fuse or breaker. You will probably actually use a 100 amp panel to give you enough spaces. There are two types, main breaker and main lug. What you buy depends on if the subpanel is in the same building. Usually a main lug panel is used if in the same building. If it is used in a detached structure often a main breaker panel is used because the main breaker can serve as the disconnect required for panels that have space for more than six circuits. A main lug could also be used but than you must add a means of disconnect if there is space for more than six circuits.

Whatever panel you buy you will need to add a ground bar. Tell us if it will be in the same building and what loads it will have and we will better be able to help. Have you looked at: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-diagrams.html?
and install a 60A main breaker in it as well
Not for use as a breaker but sometimes as a required means of disconnect. If as mentioned above it is a detached structure and you use a main lug panel then you would install a back fed 60amp (or larger) breaker as a disconnect. However with a main breaker panel so long as the main breaker is 60 amps or larger it serves as the disconnect. The breaker in the subpanel can be larger than 60 amp because it is only used as a switch.
 
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Old 05-11-14, 06:40 PM
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ray2047 - thanks!

It will be in the same building. Sounds like I could do a main lug, but I may have more than 6 circuits eventually, so I'll just plan ahead and have a main breaker panel.

I checked out the subpanel page which was quite helpful -- so I'll add a ground bar, NOT tie it in to the neutral bar in the subpanel, and run 2 hots, 1 neutral and 1 ground from the main panel with no need for a grounding rod.
 
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Old 05-11-14, 06:52 PM
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and install a 60A main breaker in it as well
No disconnect needed in the same building regardless of the number of spaces.. I would suggest at least a 100 amp panel with 12 spaces. (Spaces are like money. No matter how many you have you find uses for them.)
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-12-14 at 08:49 AM.
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Old 05-12-14, 07:35 AM
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At the home center I don't see specific "subpanels" just general load centers.
Look at both 100 amp and 125 amp main lug panels at your home center. There are usually several small 8-16 and 12-24 panels to choose from that run roughly $25 to $30.
 
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