Oven element replacement questions

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  #1  
Old 05-18-14, 03:13 PM
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Oven element replacement questions

Hi. I had an oven bake element go out and just received the replacement. However, when I went to replace it I discovered that there is no breaker for the oven -- nor do I see a convenient plug behind the oven. This is a 30-year old house and I read that, while bad practice, it's not completely uncommon for older houses to have rigged the oven this way. This is standard Frigidaire electric range oven, btw, pretty ancient... probably came with the house.

Regardless, I *assume* that if the oven dial is off that there is no current, but I don't want to get fried during replacement. I have 2 questions:

1) Is one side of the element plug positive and the other side negative? Im assuming hooking one side of multimeter to plug on left side and the other to the right side is how to verify whether it's live, but want to make sure.

2) Would continuity setting on multimeter be best way to verify whether it's live or not?

Pretty basic questions, but since it's high amperage without a breaker I want to make sure. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 05-18-14, 04:16 PM
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1) Is one side of the element plug positive and the other side negative?
No. It is AC not DC.
Would continuity setting on multimeter be best way to verify whether it's live or not?
Only if you want to let the smoke out of your multimeter. You would set the multimeter to the AC voltage scale above 250.
there is no breaker for the oven
Do not make any attempt to replace the element until the wiring has been corrected. Based on your questions I would suggest you call an electrician and have your oven power supply corrected first. It is unsafe. We could talk you through correcting the wiring but it may be above your skill level.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 05-18-14 at 09:28 PM.
  #3  
Old 05-18-14, 07:55 PM
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This is a 30-year old house and I read that, while bad practice, it's not completely uncommon for older houses to have rigged the oven this way.
No, it would not be common at all to find a range rigged this way unless you live in a rural area that had no permit/inspection process when the house was built. It's also useful to know the reputation and background of the builder in situations like this. The most common thing to do to work on a range is to unplug it, but I realize that 30 years ago many ranges were hardwired. If your range circuit was just rigged when the house was built, you probably should have the electrician look over the entire electrical system and see what else he finds just rigged.
 
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Old 05-18-14, 08:43 PM
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Lots of good information here and one more piece.....

In most electric ovens..... only one side of the power is disconnected to the element which means you CANNOT change the element without disconnecting all AC power from the unit.
 
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