30 amp converter breakers

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  #1  
Old 05-29-14, 11:05 AM
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30 amp converter breakers

I just got a wf-8712 30 amp converter for my camper. There is space for 2 breakers on the panel. I plan on installing one 15 amp circuit and one 20 amp circuit. Customer service is telling me that a 30 amp "main" breaker is needed. I am not understanding how this main breaker works because it would be attached to panel right beside the 15/20 amp breaker I would use for the branch circuits. How would that act as a main breaker? Then there is a pigtail wire labeled pigtail for branch circuits? Are they wanting me to attach the branch breaker to the main breaker and not the panel?

Thanks for any help,

Bill
 
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  #2  
Old 05-29-14, 11:09 AM
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Are you sure that's the right part number? All the searches that I'm doing is pulling up a 12A converter. That model lists: Input: 105-130 VAC, 60 Hz (163 watt), so a 15A breaker would be more than sufficient.

I'm thinking I'm looking at the wrong device though.
 
  #3  
Old 05-29-14, 11:23 AM
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that's the right one. The power comes from a 30 amp hookup or generator.
 
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Old 05-29-14, 11:39 AM
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The 12 amp refers the the battery charger output.

You would install a 30 amp single pole breaker in the panel then connect the hot leg from the power cord to it.
This will then backfeed the bus to energize the other breaker(s) and act as a disconnect.

I took a look at the manual and it was not clear on how many breakers your model can support.
it said there was room for one 30 amp disconnect breaker and three circuits.
Are there not four slots on the bus bar?

I have a similar panel in my camper and it has a double 30/20 amp breaker plus three additional 15 amp breakers.
The 30 amp has the hot from the power cord connected to it and the 20 amp feeds the air conditioner.
 
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Old 05-29-14, 12:18 PM
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Thanks, great explanation. I think the diagram shows the hot from the power cord connected to the panel, but your way makes more sense for having the 30 amp breaker as a disconnect.

Bill
 
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Old 05-29-14, 12:57 PM
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Back fed breakers need a hold down kit to prevent them from coming loose while energized. A potentially dangerous situation. NEC may not apply in your case but if it does code requires it.
 
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Old 05-29-14, 01:51 PM
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there is a pre-installed main breaker retaining clip, which it now makes sense to me why it is there.
 
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Old 06-08-14, 07:39 AM
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Additional questions. The green wire from the power cord connects to the converter where it is labeled chassis ground. When connecting the converter to the chassis, can I use the same type and gauge (12-14) of wire as my tail lights, or should I us something heavier?

Also, there is a pre-installed black wire connected to the bus. Since I am back feeding the breakers (see earlier replys) should I just bypass and cap that wire?

Thanks again. Bill
 
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Old 06-08-14, 09:19 AM
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Tail light wire insulation may be rater for less than 240 volts. You need wire rated for use on 240 volt AC.
there is a pre-installed black wire connected to the bus. Since I am back feeding the breakers (see earlier replys) should I just bypass and cap that wire
Please refresh our memory on that wire.
 
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Old 06-08-14, 01:05 PM
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I didn't mention that wire previously. It is connected to the bus and labeled connector.
 
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Old 06-08-14, 01:37 PM
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If it is not needed remove it. Could you post a picture of it? http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...-pictures.html
 
  #12  
Old 06-08-14, 03:39 PM
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its a little hard to see under the white wires to the right. I had to remove the second breaker to see it. It might be hard to remove, its more of a permanent attachment, not a screw. The yellow wire nut is the other end.

From the wiring diagram, it looks to be connected to the power cord. I already have the black from the power chord wired into the 30 amp breaker on the left, back feeding the second breaker.

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  #13  
Old 06-08-14, 08:15 PM
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I think the black wire could be to feed another subpanel. Personally, I would leave it because 2 circuits isn't enough to live off, even when camping.
 
  #14  
Old 06-09-14, 05:37 AM
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Lol!......
2 circuits isn't enough to live off, even when camping.
Never been camping with no more power than your flashlight batteries?

The manual in the link I provided above labels the black wire as "BLACK WIRE (FROM CONVERTER)".
Converters I am familiar with feed the battery charger and 12 volt relays from a breaker but yours must not.
That wire is needed to power your 12 volt system while on shore power and to charge the battery.

One thing to keep in mind when working on 12 volt rv power systems is that they often color code the 12 volt DC side as white = negative and black = positive as opposed to automotive that uses black = negative and red = positive.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 04:55 PM
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30 amp converter to generator

OK thanks to all of the help, I have my converter hooked up and will work good off of shore power.

The first place I am taking it will not have shore power, so I was thinking of buying a small 800 w generator so that I don't have to lug my big 5000 w one around. The ones I have been looking at only have a 15 amp output. I have the 30 to 15 amp plug adapter, but will that output be ok for the converter and my 15/20 amp circuits up to the 800 w?

thanks
 
  #16  
Old 06-17-14, 06:42 PM
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An 800 watt generator may have a Nema 5-15 receptacle but will only deliver about 6 amps at 120 volts.
You would need at least a 1500 watt generator to have 12 amps which is the most a 15 amp household receptacle should provide.
A 2000 watt generator will run almost anything a 15 amp household receptacle would power including most power tools.
 
  #17  
Old 06-18-14, 07:38 AM
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Thanks again. I was checking the specs on some bigger ones. I see a 1500 w with 10 amp output and a 2000 w with 11.6 amp output.

I'm starting to like the idea of flashlights only.
 
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