Replacing service panel to 220

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  #1  
Old 06-01-14, 08:10 AM
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Replacing service panel to 220

Hello, I am wanting to change my service panel to 220 from 125 and had a question. I know how to do it, its not rocket science I did it in a house we remodeled but doing it isn't my question. In my other house I had the power company shut off the power because I replaced the siding in the house and when I was done I called them and they turned it back on no questions asked and while I did the siding I replaced the box. On this house I want to have the power shut off and if I say I'm installing a new service panel will they require me to get an inspector before turning it back on?

The panel I have now is stupid.... I have 3 240 breakers above a main beaker and they are always hot so if I wanted to change them I would have to do it hot then if I turn off main then the single pole breakers below it turn off....

Thanks!
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-14, 08:29 AM
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Informational note: Standard voltages in a home are 120/240 volts.

Almost any electrical work requires a permit and inspections. This is not a big deal as long as things are done right and follows local codes. You will have to check with your local authority as to what is required.

It sounds like you have a split bus panel. Your best option is to replace the entire panel. Post a picture of your existing panel if you can.
 
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Old 06-01-14, 01:54 PM
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Im not a certified electrician so it would be a big deal wouldnt it? Everything is being done by city code so thats not an issue....
 
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Old 06-01-14, 01:56 PM
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You best bet is to check with your inspection agency.
 
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Old 06-01-14, 03:50 PM
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Replacing the main a panel would be an advanced DIY project. Many cases it would be required to do other upgrades to the electrical system such as Smoke/CO detectors, AFCI breakers, and GFCI protection.
 
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Old 06-03-14, 05:57 AM
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Not necessarily, it the permit is for only changing the service or panel,nothing else would be required.
Geo
 
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Old 06-03-14, 06:33 AM
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Not necessarily, it the permit is for only changing the service or panel,nothing else would be required.
Geo
Thats open to interpretation and ultimately up to the AHJ.... the OP would be better off asking that question to the AHJ or the licensed electrician he should hire for such a job.
 
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Old 06-03-14, 04:31 PM
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Not necessarily, it the permit is for only changing the service or panel,nothing else would be required.
From 2011 NEC: Where a branch circuit is replaced, modified, or extended, the branch circuit shall be protected by one of the following:

1) A listed combination type AFCI located at the origin of the branch circuit

2) A listed outlet branch circuit type AFCI located at the first receptacle outlet of the existing branch circuit.

We have had other city inspectors require adding GFCI's and CO/Smoke detectors.
 
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Old 06-03-14, 05:21 PM
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Exception in NEC 2014. “Exception: AFCI protection shall not be required where the extension of the existing conductors is not more than 1.8 m (6 ft) and does not include any additional outlets or devices.


Excerpt From: National Fire Protection Association (NFPA). “NFPA 70®, National Electrical Code® (NEC®), 2014 Edition.” NFPA. iBooks.
This material may be protected by copyright.

Check out this book on the iBooks Store: https://itunes.apple.com/WebObjects/...k?id=712925892
 
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Old 06-03-14, 06:39 PM
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Im not a certified electrician
That was pretty obvious in your first post.
 
  #11  
Old 06-04-14, 04:37 AM
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Do you really need to change the panel?

You would need to do a load analysis for the house to find out whether the additional branch circuits you want to add will necessitate a new panel and/or an upgraded (amps wise) service.

Can you unsnap the 240 volt breakers (one at a time) from the top part of the existing panel? (Don't unsnap them all now; you might only want to remove one, replace it with a larger amperage breaker, and install a subpanel next to the existing panel.) Additional branch circuits and the circuit originally served by the removed breaker would be run into the subpanel.

When all the appliances, lights, etc. served by a branch circuit are switched off, unsnapping the breaker will not cause a spark to appear.

When installing a subpanel it is not necessary to have the power company pull the meter or disconnect the entire house. Usually one permit will cover the subpanel together with the new branch circuits to be added.

Often a separate permit is needed to replace the main panel.

Replacing the main a panel would be an advanced DIY project. Many cases it would be required to do other upgrades to the electrical system such as Smoke/CO detectors, AFCI breakers, and GFCI protection.
I find it hard to believe that adding smoke detectors or AFCI or GFCI receptacles would necessitate replacing the service panel (unless the load analysis figures just went over the old panel amperes or watts rating).

That was pretty obvious in your first post.
That did not jump out at me.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 06-04-14 at 05:15 AM.
  #12  
Old 06-04-14, 05:26 AM
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That did not jump out at me.
It did to me, no one makes a 220 amp panel.

I am wanting to change my service panel to 220 from 125
The existing panel is a 125 amp split bus 120/240 volt and has 2 pole 240 volt breakers in it already so it obviously isn't a 125 volt panel.
 
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Old 06-04-14, 03:39 PM
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I find it hard to believe that adding smoke detectors or AFCI or GFCI receptacles would necessitate replacing the service panel.
You misunderstood. I will try again;

In some cities around here, when you change the electrical panel out, you are also required to add CO/smoke detectors, add AFCI breakers to the required circuits, and install GFCI's in required locations. (Bathrooms, kitchens, etc.) You do not have to change a panel out just for adding smoke/CO detectors, or doing other modifications to the electrical system.

Sorry if I was not being clear.
 
  #14  
Old 06-05-14, 04:17 AM
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Another thing you want to consider and be sure you check. Since you are upgrading the panel (more amps) be absolutely sure that the existing service entrance wire running from the power source (where connection to house from power utility) to meter, meter box rating and wire going from meter box to new panel is rated for the new higher amperage; don't accidently over look that point. Could have horrible outcome otherwise. Maybe you considered this already but did not want to leave it to chance. It would be easy for a DIY to overlook that requirement. I did not see this in the replies; unless I missed it.
 
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Old 06-05-14, 09:58 AM
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Its all speculation until the guy consults the AHJ or his licensed electrician.
 
  #16  
Old 06-05-14, 06:20 PM
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Its all speculation until the guy consults the AHJ or his licensed electrician.
From what he said, it sounds as if the OP plans on changing the panel himself. It is, however, speculation as to how many amps he will be installing, but I'd guess he is looking at a 200 amp panel. The OP never mentioned changing the existing 125 amp service entrance wiring or meter socket or upgrading the grounding.
 
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