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Measuring, Cutting, and Threading EMT Steel Conduit Pipe to Connectors

Measuring, Cutting, and Threading EMT Steel Conduit Pipe to Connectors

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  #1  
Old 06-02-14, 12:57 AM
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Measuring, Cutting, and Threading EMT Steel Conduit Pipe to Connectors

Hi, all.

To make a long story short. I am building a ballet barre out of EMT Steel pipes. Here are the plans:
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_D9Pj5ctfZ_...0/IMG_0471.JPG

The pipes will be of 1-1/2" or 1-1/4" EMT Steel Conduit (either that or Schedule 40 Steel).

I need the pipes to be male threaded, and joined together by female threaded 90degree, short radius elbow joints, and standard tee joints.

My question(s) concern three parts:
1.) How do I measure out the pipe so the whole bar fits 5-ft. wide across, including the male-threaded pipes and the female-threaded pipe fittings for EMT? I would like the height of it to be 4 ft. also.

2.) What size elbow and tee-joints would accept 1-1/2" EMT? Getting the pipe threaded can easily be done at a Home Depot or Lowe's, I am having the hardest time, however, trying to find threaded elbow and tee-joints that accept 1-1/2" pipe, will I have to get these fittings threaded or are they pretty common to find?

3.) How can I set up the design so that the horizontal bars will screw into the both joints on both sides of the bar, without the one end unscrewing out of the other?
For some reason, some online have figured out how to make their barres without needing "union" joints in place. Would getting the pipes threaded in opposite ways be the solution?

Thanks all for any help.
 
  #2  
Old 06-02-14, 03:30 AM
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EMT is thin wall conduit and can not be threaded. It is connected with set screw or compression fittings. You need IMC or RMC but galvanized pipe may be best for your needs.
 
  #3  
Old 06-02-14, 09:04 AM
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I've built similar things out of steel pipe (black steel or galvanized). You may be better off with IMC since it will have a smoother surface.

Another option before getting into the details is to use Kee Clamps. Instead of threaded pipe, you use standard pipe (steel, aluminum, whatever you want) and they slip into the clamps and are tightened with a hex screw.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]32680[/ATTACH]
Kee Klamp Pipe Fittings

If you decide to stick with threaded pipe...

1.) How do I measure out the pipe so the whole bar fits 5-ft. wide across, including the male-threaded pipes and the female-threaded pipe fittings for EMT? I would like the height of it to be 4 ft. also.
For 1.5" pipe, the thread depth is about 3/4". That means 3/4" on each end will 'disappear' into the fitting. You'd just have to calculate the size based on the width of the 90degree elbows.

2.) What size elbow and tee-joints would accept 1-1/2" EMT? Getting the pipe threaded can easily be done at a Home Depot or Lowe's, I am having the hardest time, however, trying to find threaded elbow and tee-joints that accept 1-1/2" pipe, will I have to get these fittings threaded or are they pretty common to find?
Again, if you use IMC/RMC or steel plumbing/gas pipe, the fittings you're looking for should be available in any store

3.) How can I set up the design so that the horizontal bars will screw into the both joints on both sides of the bar, without the one end unscrewing out of the other?
Yes, you can have the pipes oppositely threaded. I doubt a home depot has the dies to do this, but I'm sure you can find someone to do it. You can also buy right/left thread nipples, though they are getting harder to find since they are no longer code compliant in most cases. (though you're not concerned with gas piping code in your case)
 
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Old 06-02-14, 09:14 AM
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Please know that there are steel gas pipes and steel water pipes, but there is no such thing as steel electrical pipes; the electrical Wiring Method that resembles steel pipe is Rigid Metal Conduit.

You purpose is best effected using steel pipe and steel elbows and "tees". All pipe-sections and fittings ( elbows and tees) can be threaded together with two exceptions ; coupling the two horizontal pipes sections ( already threaded in the left pipe-assembly) into the right pipe-assembly.

This is done with two "Erickson couplings" and two short pipe nipples , the two nipples threaded onto the elbow and tee of the right pipe-assembly. One part of the Erickson coupling threads onto the nipple; the other part threads onto the pipe-section extending left-to-right. A loose threaded collar on the coupling will "pull together, face-to-face" the two parts of the coupling.
 
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Old 06-02-14, 11:22 AM
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Oh wow, thanks!

So between IMC, RMC or Galvanized pipe.

Sorry, I'm a complete newbie when it comes to this stuff. I only heard about EMT from a website I was trying to copy. And the only reason I know of Black Steel is because I was told that that was what cast iron cookware was made out of. So all of this other stuff is new to me.

I know Galvanized pipe is used for things like fencing, but I have no idea the comparative properties between IMC/RMC, Galv. steel and Black Steel. Can someone possibly break these down and sort of explain them?

I understand after a quick google search that IMC is the smoother, lighter and cheaper and more ferrous (so it will rust easier) version of RMC but I am not clear on how it differs from Galvanized pipe And Black Steel in terms of cost and function
 

Last edited by Ah Kua; 06-02-14 at 11:44 AM.
  #6  
Old 06-02-14, 11:37 AM
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The Kee Clamps sound incredible and spot on! I think I'll go that route. Though I've not too experienced with them? Would they be sturdy enough to hold the barres together?

It seems it would be a hell of a lot easier than this whole "threading" business, which is making my head spin.

Here is a guy who sells a the tee joints and elbow joints needed for a ballet barre (the customer has to buy the pipe though), for an insane amount of money (almost $300).

Are these kee clamps that he is using? They look similar to the kee clamp connectors I saw in that link.:
http://www.halebarre.com/sitebuilder...10_Kit_Web.jpg
Double Rail Ballet Barre Instructions
 
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Old 06-02-14, 11:49 AM
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Nevermind! Kee-Clamps indeed are sturdy enough! If half a dozen grown men can hang from them without the bars collapsing, then I am definitely safe!:
Parkour Structure on Pinterest
 
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Old 06-02-14, 11:56 AM
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The only thing left to decide on is the choice of metal to go with. And I am good to go!
 
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Old 06-02-14, 10:05 PM
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Otay, guys...

1-1/2" RMC is going for $32.48 per 10', while 1-1/2" Galvanized steel pipe is going for $40.42 per 10'.

Obviously the galvanized steel is higher in cost-- which one should I go with?

I don't understand the differerences between the two, and Google isn't telling me much.
 
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Old 06-03-14, 05:34 AM
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Im looking to put a railing up on my backdoor but don't want to deal with wood. Please post a link if you find those Kee Klamps for a decent price... im sure they are expensive.
 
 

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