exposed service drop connections


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Old 06-03-14, 05:31 AM
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exposed service drop connections

Whay are there exposed connections at the weatherhead of an overhead service? How come rain doesn't effect the splices?

On mine, the crimps are exposed I assume and I see a bare green neutral wire twisted with the two insulated wire.

Why is that allowed?
 
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Old 06-03-14, 05:45 AM
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This is just a guess. The crimp sleeve puts enough pressure on the wires that the metal molecules where the wires touch interact and that corrosion does not seep in between, although the exposed surfaces of the wires will develop a thin layer of corrosion (copper turns green).

Incidentally, the clamp on connections at the utility poles, including from the pole transformers to the medium tension (primary) lines are usually not covered either.

Splices are, of course, covered where they might otherwise touch one another or the support wire and cause a short circuit.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 06-03-14 at 06:01 AM.
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Old 06-03-14, 07:28 PM
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On mine, the crimps are exposed I assume and I see a bare green neutral wire twisted with the two insulated wire.
The crimps on the hot lines should be insulated; the neutral crimp connection is usually left bare. Usually this is done with a snap-on plastic cover, but sometimes the utilities do it with friction tape. A bare green neutral conductor is oxidixed copper. The neutral could be connected with one or more insulated or uninsulated neutral conductors.
 
 

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