Kitchen Wiring 101---Help Please

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Old 06-16-14, 04:29 PM
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Kitchen Wiring 101---Help Please

I am wiring up my kitchen. I was talking with my boss who is pretty good with wiring. I was talking with him about the wiring and he told me I shouldn't run it as a series circuit but a parallel circuit. Is this true? I have been doing some digging and I cant find anybody who has done it this way.

Another question I have is I keep seeing that I need 2 separate circuits for just the small appliance receptacles. Does that mean, lets say I have 4 receptacles in the kitchen for small appliances. 2 go on one dedicated circuit and 2 go on another dedicated circuit? I just want ti be sure before I start wiring stuff up.

Thanks for any help
 
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Old 06-16-14, 05:00 PM
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he told me I shouldn't run it as a series circuit but a parallel circuit. Is this true?
I think you are confused about what series means. I think what you are calling series is really daisy chaining where receptacle A feeds receptacle B feeds C, etc. Daisy chaining is fine so long as the connections are parallel.
Does that mean, lets say I have 4 receptacles in the kitchen for small appliances. 2 go on one dedicated circuit and 2 go on another dedicated circuit?
That is correct and they must be on a 20 amp breaker and GFCI protected. Usually you make the first receptacle GFCI then you feed the other receptacles from the load side. Only the first receptacle in that case is GFCI. The rest are regular receptacles.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:10 PM
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Now im not a expert but when I was in trade school it was a automtove trade school but we learned about electrical work. I was taught that the series was when the first receptacle in the circuit is the only one getting power while the other are just feeding off of it and a parallel circuit is when each receptacle is getting its power directly from, the breaker.

In a series circuit if the receptacle that is getting the power straight from the breaker is broken off from the other receptacles then the other receptacles cease to work.

But in a parallel circuit each receptacle is getting its power from the breaker. So if one receptacle fails the others will keep working.

I don t know what you mean by its okay to daisy chain just as long as its parallel. Daisy chain is a series.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:29 PM
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Okay so lets just keep it short and sweet. If I was getting my house inspected which wiring method would I need Parallel or Series?
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:41 PM
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I remodeled my room and I did the room in a series circuit. Meaning if the main outlet goes out they all go out. I was under the impression that was the correct way of doing it. SON OF A *****! Im so mad right now.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:56 PM
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The old christmas lights were wired in series. That is the reason if one bulb went out they all went out.



There is a good chance that you can change your wiring to work.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 06:58 PM
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If you had done it series it wouldn't have worked. You are misunderstanding what series is.

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Old 06-16-14, 07:15 PM
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Okay I got you now. Yeah I forgot a series is just a big loop like a race track.

That visual did the trick. I honestly thought the daisy chain was the same thing. But that picture did the trick. My room is wired exactly like the daisy chain pic. So just to be perfectly clear the daisy chain in the illustration is a parallel circuit and that is the proper way of doing it? Because even if one of the receptacle fail it is still able to receive power.

I just want to be 100% before I really start moving on this.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 07:24 PM
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If a connection at one of the devices fails the circuit will be dead downstream from that point. This is why some like to pigtail to the devices. That way a poor connection only affects one device.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 07:35 PM
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Here is a pigtail circuit.

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Old 06-16-14, 07:53 PM
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[/U

This is the same thing. I don't mean to be annoying with this but I tend to over analyze things and I'm just trying to break this down so I completely understand it.
 
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Old 06-16-14, 08:50 PM
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Yes, the black and white of the two cables are connected to pigtails and the pigtails to one screw on each side of the receptacle.

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Old 06-17-14, 05:13 AM
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Whoa whats going on here? Why is there 2 lines for 1 receptacle? Is this the way it has to be done in the kitchen?
 
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Old 06-17-14, 05:27 AM
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The two lines are power in and power out to the rest of the circuit. Just think of the splices you drew as being in the box and you will have Rays diagram.

In the kitchen you need GFI protection so you will have two cables in the box. Power in goes to the line terminals.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 05:42 AM
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Is this a multiwire branch circuit? if your dealing with small appliance circuits in your kitchen then there is a good chance it is. If so you cannot depend on the device for the continuity of the circuit.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 06:12 AM
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Not a MWBC. The neutral is just shown in red for contrast.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 06:36 AM
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I understand that now. I was confused about what was a series circuit but I now know the difference.

I understand the concept of running the lines parallel, Meaning I know that each receptacle has to be getting power directly from the line coming from the breaker via the pig tails.

I just want to make sure when I do run the lines everything will be done correctly.

I am just not understanding power in and power out. Why do I need 2 wires coming from the breaker box going to 1 circuit?
 
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Old 06-17-14, 06:41 AM
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Would this be the correct way of wiring it. Just so you know I only have 4 outlets on the kitchen for small appliances and I was going to split them up. Meaning every 2 outlets would be on their own dedicated circuit. So do I now need 4 breakers for 2 circuits or am I over complicating this?
 
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Old 06-17-14, 06:45 AM
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You only need one breaker per circuit. If you were to splice a hot from each breaker it may trip the breaker as it would be a short to the opposite leg of the panel.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 06:48 AM
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Not a MWBC. The neutral is just shown in red for contrast.
Im not talking about the diagrams. The OP in his confusion never mentioned if it was MWBC or not. And nobody asked either. Sounds likes a recipe for failure.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 07:11 AM
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I don't know what you mean by multi wire branch. I am only putting 2 receptacles on each circuit. Everything else in the kitchen will be on its own circuit. So the Fridge,Oven,Micro,Dishwasher,Garbage disposal, and lighting will have their own dedicated circuits
.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 07:22 AM
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A MWBC does not apply in your case since you are running 2 cables from the panel. A MWBC is where two hots share a common neutral.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 07:48 AM
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BigBoy is right, you cant use the screws on a shared neutral circuit .... however, it looks like LandoGriffin is starting from scratch... hence no MWBC. Lando listen to what the guys are telling you about this... I have learned a ton from them and even rewired my garage with their help (unknowingly).
 
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Old 06-17-14, 07:56 AM
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So is this the correct way of wiring it or no? Not trying to be rude but I am just looking for a yes or no. Just to make things simple.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:04 AM
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Trust me I am listening to what these are telling me. Ive gotten plenty of help before and everything turned out great that is why I posted my question on this forum. I know everyone is helpful and knowledgeable.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:13 AM
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So is this the correct way of wiring it or no? Not trying to be rude but I am just looking for a yes or no. Just to make things simple.
Electrically that is correct, but since this is a small appliance branch circuit, the way you have drawn it both devices will have to be GFCI receptacles. What I would do is use a GFCI receptacle as the first receptacle and wire the second duplex receptacle from the LOAD terminals of the GFCI device.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:16 AM
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The latest diagram shown would be correct for one circuit but would require two gfis. If power is fed into box 1 line terminals, box 2 will be fed from the load terminals to a regular duplex. No pigtail except for ground will be needed. Repeat for other circuit.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:28 AM
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Not done this way at the GFCI

.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:31 AM
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Rays diagram is correct for two GFI receptacles..
 
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Old 06-17-14, 08:33 AM
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First receptacle only GFCI.

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Old 06-17-14, 09:36 AM
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I was going to do 2 GFI's or is that not necessary?
 
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Old 06-17-14, 09:40 AM
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Not necessary. The downstream can be protected by the first GFI if wired from the load terminals.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 10:20 AM
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Wait... so from Load terminal on the GFI to load terminal on the downstream receptacle for that downstream receptacle to be protected?
 
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Old 06-17-14, 10:21 AM
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You should really read the book Wiring Simplified available at Amazon and in the electrical aisle of some bigbox stores
 
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Old 06-17-14, 10:31 AM
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Yeah I actually have a book I picked up I just seemed to have misplaced it. I really want to get into electric vehicles. I want to convert my 1991 crx to all electric.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 10:56 AM
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A regular duplex does not have line and load terminals.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 11:28 AM
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Okay so it doesn't matter where I hook the wires on the duplex? Top or bottom is fine.
 
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Old 06-17-14, 11:37 AM
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Receptacles have no top or bottom. They can be installed with the ground opening on the bottom or top or left or right. Look at the non GFCI receptacle and you will see the two screws on the side are connected by a metal tab so basically they are electrically the same.

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Old 06-17-14, 11:52 AM
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Cool......Alright thanks Guys for all the help I really appreciate. Yous are all awesome. Sorry if I was being a little difficult but I over think a lot of things so if it isn't just spelled out Ill end up confusing my self. I just like to be 100% percent about everything but I think I have all the info I need.

Thanks for all the help guys
 
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Old 06-17-14, 01:01 PM
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No problem. Good luck on your project.
 
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