Creating a 220v outlet.

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Old 06-30-14, 08:10 PM
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Creating a 220v outlet.

I have never dealt with 220v before. I have installed/wired for 110v throughout the house. However, I want to install a 220v outlet in my garage(to possibly run a 220v air compressor or a 220v welder). I have a water heater in my garage which is 220v and it is hooked up like this

I was wondering if I could just make an outlet out of that with two plugs, one for the water heater and the other for whatever I need.

Also for non-GFCI, what would something like that be used for? freezer/fridge? I have one in my garage right below and to the right of that outlet.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 08:22 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

Just so you know, the voltages in your home are 120/240.

Yes, you could change the direct wire and change the water heater feed to a 30 amp/240 volt receptacle, and install a 30 amp/ 240 volt 3 wire cord to the water heater. Then you would just have the same cord on the compressor/welder. However, I would suspect this would get to be a hassle quickly, especially when somebody runs out of hot water. The better option is to run a new circuit from your electrical panel just for the "toys" and leave the water heater as is.

Also for non-GFCI, what would something like that be used for? freezer/fridge?
Correct. Before the code was changed (2008 IIRC) it was allowed to have a non-GFCI protected receptacle in a garage for non moveable equipment such as freezers/fridges as long as it was a simplex for one piece of equipment, or a duplex for two. That code has since been changed.

On a side note, if that simplex receptacle is not being used, you might be able to change that into a 240 volt circuit for a compressor/welder if it is dedicated. The limitation is it is likely "only" a 15 or 20 amp circuit, which might be fine depending on the compressor/welder.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 08:28 PM
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Your house is 120/240.
Creating a 220v outlet.

I have never dealt with 220v before. I have installed/wired for 110v throughout the house. However, I want to install a 220v outlet in my garage(to possibly run a 220v air compressor or a 220v welder). I have a water heater in my garage which is 220v and it is hooked up like this
I was wondering if I could just make an outlet out of that with two plugs, one for the water heater and the other for whatever I need.
No, you need to have a dedicated circuit for each. The receptacle for the compressor will be of a type based on the amp draw of the compressor. The breaker and wire size used is also determined by the amp draw of the compressor. There isn't a one size fits all solution.
for non-GFCI, what would something like that be used for? freezer/fridge? I have one in my garage right below and to the right of that outlet.
All garage 120v receptacles must be GFCI protected, no exception. Maybe it is fed from the load side of another GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 08:36 PM
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You need a dedicated circuit for each piece of equipment. Your air compressor will most likely take a 20A 240V circuit, while your welder will most likely take a 50A 240V circuit.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 08:46 PM
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Yea, its just seems it would be a pain to have dedicated wiring circuit from my box to the garage (too far, opposite side of the house) I just wanted to see if it would be wise to use existing wiring.

As far as the non-GFCI outlet goes, its 120v now. My home was built under 5 years ago. Can a 110v non-GFCI be converted to 240v?
 
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Old 06-30-14, 08:56 PM
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Can a 110v non-GFCI be converted to 240v?
If it is dedicated, and there is an additional space in your panel, yes.

BTW - There are many types of welders out there that use voltages anywhere from 120 volts 15 amps, through 240 volts, 50 amps, and many in between. There are even three phase 480 volt welders, but that is another story. Point is, you should be able to find a welder that fit syour needs and available power.
 
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Old 06-30-14, 09:24 PM
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I have never seen a water heater list for a cord and plug connection.
 
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