Pool shed wiring questions

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  #1  
Old 07-07-14, 07:47 PM
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Pool shed wiring questions

Hello, I am familiar with wiring, but this one is a bit different. I want to make sure I'm not overlooking something. Thank you in advance!

I have an in-ground pool with it's own main power panel near the pool. It has many breakers in it for the various pool equipment. It has at least 4 open spots for additional breakers. It also has plenty of capacity. We just built a shed directly in front of the pool panel so that now the panel is only about 6" or so from the shed back wall. We want to wire the shed with a few interior and exterior outlets, 3 interior LED can lights and 3 exterior LED can lights. One of the interior outlets will be used for a mini-fridge. One other might have a small microwave. The others will rarely be used.

I plan to run liquid flexible nonmetallic conduit from the existing panel to the shed. I'm thinking one run of 1/2" conduit with conductors for 2 separate 20 amp circuits. Each run will be made with 12 AWG THWN. Both runs will go to the closest outlet and then switch to 12 AWG romex (I have not done a fill calculation, but I assume I can get a box large enough for all those wires). One run will continue to the other outlets (total of 7 or 8 outlets). The outlets will be GFCI (first outlet only to protect entire circuit). The other run will go to the switch box for the lights (2 separate switches) and go to the lights.

Some of my questions are:

1. I assume there is an outlet box / switch box that can accept conduit and convert to romex?
2. I assume that I don't have to worry about having the mini-fridge or microwave on a separate circuit or something like that. The microwave might go if it needs a separate circuit!
3. Do the lights need to be GFCI protected.
4. Anything you would do differently?

Thank you again for your time.
 
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Old 07-07-14, 08:46 PM
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I plan to run liquid flexible nonmetallic conduit from the existing panel to the shed. I'm thinking one run of 1/2" conduit with conductors for 2 separate 20 amp circuits. Each run will be made with 12 AWG THWN. Both runs will go to the closest outlet and then switch to 12 AWG romex (I have not done a fill calculation, but I assume I can get a box large enough for all those wires). One run will continue to the other outlets (total of 7 or 8 outlets). The outlets will be GFCI (first outlet only to protect entire circuit). The other run will go to the switch box for the lights (2 separate switches) and go to the lights
Is the shed attached or detached? You should have no problem finding a box big enough.

1. I assume there is an outlet box / switch box that can accept conduit and convert to romex?
Yes, a typical 4X4 "1900" box should work. Be sure to use the proper Romex connectors.
2. I assume that I don't have to worry about having the mini-fridge or microwave on a separate circuit or something like that. The microwave might go if it needs a separate circuit!
If it uses more than 50% or the circuit's capacity it needs a dedicated circuit.
3. Do the lights need to be GFCI protected.
No.
4. Anything you would do differently?
Personally, I would do the whole shed in conduit if it's going to be visible, but that's just for aesthetics.
 
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Old 07-08-14, 02:41 PM
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Thank you Justin, your reply is very helpful.

The shed is detached from the house.

I just realized I can use a common ground wire for both circuits in the conduit. So I just tie all grounds back through that common ground?
 
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Old 07-08-14, 05:47 PM
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Since the shed is detached you can only have 1 circuit. A multiwire circuit counts as 1 circuit, so you'll need to use a 2-pole circuit breaker and a shared neutral.
 
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Old 07-08-14, 07:50 PM
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I was worried about that. I am curious though because the panel is fed by a 60 amp breaker in my main panel out to the panel by the shed/pool. So could the panel by the shed (literally 6" from the shed wall) be considered a sub for the pool and shed? The panel is a Pentair Easy Touch 8 load center specifically made for pool equipment. Does this make it acceptable to run more than one circuit?

Do I need a disconnect means or is the pool panel my disconnect since it is right at the shed?

The load center currently has 4 breakers in it. A 240 20 amp for the pool pump, a 240 15 amp for the heater, a 120 20 amp for the pool lights and a 120 20 amp for one outlet that is not used near the pool equipment (I presume this is required by code). The pool lights are 3 LED lights that are powered by a 300 watt transformer. I assume that I could not just use these existing circuits and add the shed lights to the pool light circuit and add additional outlets to the pool equipment outlet.
 
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Old 07-08-14, 08:28 PM
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I was worried about that. I am curious though because the panel is fed by a 60 amp breaker in my main panel out to the panel by the shed/pool. So could the panel by the shed (literally 6" from the shed wall) be considered a sub for the pool and shed? The panel is a Pentair Easy Touch 8 load center specifically made for pool equipment. Does this make it acceptable to run more than one circuit?

So is the panel on like a 4*4 post or something similar? I would just run a short piece of wood between the two and mount the flex conduit on that. If you have the short piece of wood it is now attached.

Do I need a disconnect means or is the pool panel my disconnect since it is right at the shed?
If it's the same structure you don't need another disconnect.

The load center currently has 4 breakers in it. A 240 20 amp for the pool pump, a 240 15 amp for the heater, a 120 20 amp for the pool lights and a 120 20 amp for one outlet that is not used near the pool equipment (I presume this is required by code). The pool lights are 3 LED lights that are powered by a 300 watt transformer. I assume that I could not just use these existing circuits and add the shed lights to the pool light circuit and add additional outlets to the pool equipment outlet.
I would run new circuits if that's possible.
 
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Old 07-09-14, 08:01 AM
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So I think you have helped me with two great solutions:

1. Connect the existing pool panel to the shed. This would allow me to treat the panel as a subpanel for the shed and wire it as I would any other detached structure. You are correct in that the panel is attached to two 4 x 4s. I would just need to figure out a good way to connect one of the 4 x 4s to the newly sided building without creating a spot for water to enter the shed.

2. Keep the pool panel separate and run a multiwire branch circuit to the shed. If I do this though it sounds like I need a disconnect where the circuit enters the shed? I don't particularly like using a switch inside the shed because someone could turn it off and shut off the refrigerator. Would it be possible to mount this to the back of the shed and use it as the disconnect and change over from THWN to romex? Take the place of the LB?

Eaton 60 Amp 120/240-Volt 14,400-Watt Non-Fused Air Conditioning Disconnect-DPU222RP at The Home Depot

This one is more money, but it has a breaker and is available locally.

Shop Square D 60-Amp Non-Fusible Non-Metallic Enclosed Circuit Breaker at Lowes.com
 
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Old 07-09-14, 08:51 PM
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Either of those solutions you listed would work. I would use the non-metallic disconnect made by Square D, and mount it on the outside of the building. You can padlock it if you like. Also, that is not actually a breaker, it's a switch. You can take that out if you'd like and put a real breaker in there.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 07:27 AM
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that is not actually a breaker, it's a switch. You can take that out if you'd like and put a real breaker in there.
Justin, you may be right, but the description says it is an enclosed circuit breaker.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 09:50 AM
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Thank you, you have been a huge help!
 
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