Baseboard heater installation in the bathroom

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  #1  
Old 07-10-14, 09:16 AM
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Baseboard heater installation in the bathroom

I think I have this correct but I'd like to verify.

I'm going to install a 30 inch, 120v, 500 watt baseboard heater in my 36 square foot bathroom.

The amps (per my calculation) is 4.16 amps and 5.2 amps continuous. If this is the only thing on this circuit (and it will be) it seems that I could put this on a 15 amp circuit, with 14/2 wire. Is that correct?

And I presume that even with a heater this small, and the apparent excess in amps available, that I can't put anything else on this circuit such as an outlet, right?

Am I missing anything?

Thanks in advance for any assistance!
 
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Old 07-10-14, 09:31 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

A receptacle and that heater can be on the same 15A circuit. However, that doesn't include a receptacle in the bathroom, which should be on its own separate 20A circuit.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 09:34 AM
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The killer is "bathroom". I do not think electric baseboard heaters are permitted in a bathroom.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 09:35 AM
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The amps (per my calculation) is 4.16 amps and 5.2 amps continuous. If this is the only thing on this circuit (and it will be) it seems that I could put this on a 15 amp circuit, with 14/2 wire. Is that correct?
The amps would be 4.1666666. Where did you get 5.2 amps? 14-2 NM-B cable on a 15 amp breaker would work. I wouldn't put anything else on this circuit. Considering the small size of the room, I'd probably go with a radiant wall heater.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 09:53 AM
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I got to 5.2 amps because I thought that a heater had to have a "continuous" rating of 125% for the base calculation. I could have that wrong.

PJMax, thanks for the welcome and info.
 
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Old 07-10-14, 10:53 AM
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When you pick out the unit you are going to use..... make sure it states ok for bathrooms or conversely.... not ok for bathrooms. I would also install it connected to a GFCI breaker.
 
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