Installing a timer control for fan - help!

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  #1  
Old 07-19-14, 11:01 AM
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Installing a timer control for fan - help!

Good morning,

I thought I would ask this group for some help before I return this.

I am trying to install a timer, or rather, one of the Leviton humidity sensor/timer for the bathroom fan. This is what I see when I opened up the box for the current fan switch.

1. One Hot wire(black) goes to the switch.
2. One Load wire(black) goes to the switch.
3. 4 black wires connected together, came out of the 2 Load wire and another 2 into the wall.
4. 4 white wires connected together, all came out and go back to the wall.

The instruction calls for one Neutral wire and one Ground wire. After some research, I believe those two wires are part of the white wires that are bundled together right now. So I opened up the clamp, and determined there are two wires for the light switch, and another two for the fan switch.

This is where I run into problems. I have tried to connect one white wire to the Neutral and another white to the Ground and vice versa, but that doesn't seem to work.

Can someone offer some suggestion on things I can try?

Much appreciated.
 
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  #2  
Old 07-19-14, 11:17 AM
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What is the model of the new switch? If it has a neutral connection on the switch that would connect to the group of whites, the ground would connect to the grounds (green or bare) wires in the box ,that leaves you with 2 blacks from the old switch connect them to the remaining terminals on the new switch.
Ge
 
  #3  
Old 07-19-14, 11:38 AM
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The model is the Leviton decora IPHS5, and it doesn't seem to be any different than other fan control switch where it requires a Neutral and a Ground.

I don't see a Ground though inside the wall, so I had assumed since we have two white wires per switch, one would have to be Neutral and another would be the Ground, is that not the right assumption?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 11:51 AM
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so I had assumed since we have two white wires per switch, one would have to be Neutral and another would be the Ground,
A ground is never white. Grounds are green or bare. A good book to read before doing any wiring is Wiring Simplified available in the electrical aisle of some home stores and on line at book sellers such as Amazon.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 12:04 PM
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Ah, okay, thanks. Interesting. I'll certainly pick that up or from the library to give a good read.

I would think the current switch would need to be grounded as well though, it's interesting then that the current switch only has the Line and the Load connected to it.

Thanks Ray2047.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 01:00 PM
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Grounding is for safety no t function with one minor exception that I doubt applies here. You need to connect the white wires* to a pigtail (6"-8" length of wire same color and size) and the pigtail to the neutral terminal (silver usually) of the switch. Your black connections appear to be correct.

*What does the note about white wires say on you picture?
 
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Old 07-19-14, 01:57 PM
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This switch is line and load dependent.

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Old 07-19-14, 02:01 PM
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Hi PJmax,

Could you clarify what do you mean by line and load dependent? That is, what action should I take to take that into account?

Thanks.
 
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Old 07-19-14, 02:08 PM
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Line is power in. Load is power out to the light. You seem to have three or four blacks connected to two pigtails. One of those pigtails would be your Line for the switch. The pro way to determine line if you don't have an obvious indicator is disconnect all blacks and use a multimeter to determine which is the "hot" wire but the existing connections are enough to know with reasonable certainty with out testing.
 
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