GFI at Panel "tripping" Issue

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  #1  
Old 07-21-14, 07:59 AM
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GFI at Panel "tripping" Issue

Great Forum! I have three washrooms with 1 GFI outlet in each and they tie into a GFI circuit breaker on the panel (not sure if it's 15 or 20amps). Sometimes when I use the hairdryer on HOT setting the GFI breaker on the PANEL trips. Not immediately and not always. This happens in the early morning so I no for a fact that nothing is being used in the other 2 washrooms. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance. Paul
 
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Old 07-21-14, 08:09 AM
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You do not need the redundant GFI protection.

We need to see if the dryer is tripping the GFI component or is it tripping the overload in the breaker. Can you try the dryer in another GFI circuit?
 
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Old 07-21-14, 08:16 AM
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When u say another GFI circuit do you mean another GFI outlet that is on a different GFI Main Panel Circuit? Or just another GFI outlet. Thanks very much. Paul
 
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Old 07-21-14, 08:26 AM
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Tried it in another GFI outlet that is on a different circuit and left it running for 5 minutes. Nothing tripped. But that may not be surprising given it doesn't always trip the circuit that it usually plugged into.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 09:51 AM
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You do not need the redundant GFI protection.
PCboss is right, you do not need two GFCI devices on the same circuit. Sometimes having a GFCI receptacle connected to a GFCI circuit breaker will cause nuisance trips.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 10:37 AM
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You do not need the redundant GFI protection.
PCboss is right, you do not need two GFCI devices on the same circuit. Sometimes having a GFCI receptacle connected to a GFCI circuit breaker will cause nuisance trips.
edited: thanks ray for your input.
 

Last edited by bigboypete; 07-21-14 at 11:07 AM.
  #7  
Old 07-21-14, 11:53 AM
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Understood. Thanks. So does that mean I should replace the GFCI in my washroom with a standard outlet or remove the GFCI protected circuit in my panel? I guess what bothers me is that I never had a problem since I moved to my current location 10 years ago. I had hoped I could discover the root cause if for no other reason than for my own comfort. Thanks. Paul
 
  #8  
Old 07-26-14, 09:15 PM
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leave the gfi outlets in the bathrooms so you have a reset in each bathroom........put a regular breaker in the panel box.....15 amp for a 14 g wire or 20 amp for a 12 g wire.........BUT...THIS BREAKER MIGHT ALSO FEED OTHER OUTLETS THAT HAVE NOT HAD A GFI OUTLET INSTALLED......GARAGE,OUTSIDE,KIT COUNTER, IF YOU CHANGE THE BREAKER YOU WILL NEED TO MAKE SURE THAT ALL THE OUTLETS ON THAT CIRCUIT ARE GFI.
 
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Old 07-26-14, 10:17 PM
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Just a bit more if you feed an another GFCI downstream from the first GFCI you should feed from the line side not the load side.
 
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Old 07-26-14, 11:28 PM
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Take out the GFI in the bathroom and use just the gfi breaker. Then it trips all in one spot, no hunting the tripped gfci.
 
  #11  
Old 07-28-14, 05:10 AM
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Hairdryers all seem to have GFCI plugs on them. So any use of a hairdryer on GFCI protected circuit is redundant, no?
No. Those are RCDs to detect faults in the insulation on the wires of the cord. There is a metal mesh embedded in the outer jacket of the cord and the RCD detects current leakage from the individual wires and the metal mesh.
Ray you should correct your post. I don't own a hairdryer so I wasn't certain when you replied, but we confirmed in the other post that hairdryers do have gfcis on the cord set.

Not saying that is the issue here though .... redundant GFCI protection is likely not the problem.
 
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Old 07-28-14, 06:53 AM
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Thanks Pete. Corrected two posts but missed this one. Was already about to when I saw your post.
 
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