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Which cable and outlet box/number of points should I choose

Which cable and outlet box/number of points should I choose


  #1  
Old 07-21-14, 07:57 AM
J
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Question Which cable and outlet box/number of points should I choose

Hi there,

I would like to move 2 receptacles from rec room into kitchen. Both the rooms are separated by a staircase.

Iíve a couple of questions:
  • As you can in photos two types of cables are used to join some outlet boxes White and Black. What is the difference between them? What kind of cable I need to extend the location of the outlet box. Iíve see cables rated 300v but they are 14/2, 12/3, 10/3?
  • As you can see in the photo. I have the option of moving two 2-point outlet boxes or 1 4-point and 1 2-point outlet box. From load point of view, does it matter. If I go with 2nd option I can plug in more things but it will generate more load and it could cause the barker to switch off. How do I determine which option should I go with. Things that will be plugged in Ė electric hot plate (plugged in most of the time), kettle, mixer, microwave , deep fryer and fridge. From experience I know I cannot plug-in kettle and microwave at the same time, together the load is more than enough to turn breaker off.

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Thanks in advance for your help.

Joe Green
 
  #2  
Old 07-21-14, 07:59 AM
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Why move these? I would just install new receptacles in the kitchen and leave the existing ones alone.

What specifically do you need in the kitchen now compared to what you have?
 
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Old 07-21-14, 08:06 AM
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There are special requirements for kitchen circuits. The primary applicable one being they must be dedicated 20 amp circuits. This would not be a good idea for code reasons. Please start from the beginning and explain why you need receptacles in the kitchen.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 08:57 AM
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I see the OP is in Canada. The CEC may have additional requirements for kitchen receptacles over the NEC.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 09:40 AM
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This is granny kitchen and where the counter top and fridge is located there are no outlets on the walls. So currently extension cable is used that is plugged in rec room.

I was told by electrician that I've reached maximum capcity and there in no room on the panel to put new receptacles. In the rec room I have two many outlets which are not being used, so I tough I would move them to kitchen so I don't have to keep using extension cable. That's all.

The place where I relocate are not near sink so I don't even need GFCI receptacles. I would like to move them as per the code. If you folks suggest then I'll give call the electrician.

Relocating seemed like something I can do myself. That's all.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 09:47 AM
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If there is no room in the panel the electrician should have suggested tandems if allowed in your panel or a subpanel. Please tell us the make and model of your panel and if possible post a picture of the panel with the cover off. http://www.doityourself.com/forum/li...-pictures.html
 
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Old 07-21-14, 10:05 AM
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Because of the cost involved we don't want to go there. He suggested su-bpanel but he called back saying the didn't find it. To move two outlets he wanted $350 so that's why we haven't called him.
 
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Old 07-21-14, 10:55 AM
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Give us the panel make and model number and that picture. A third option is to combine two little used circuits to free up space.
 
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Old 07-23-14, 10:41 AM
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Here are the photos of the make and panel. I was told by electrician that there is no more space left in the panel and that I'll need subpanel for new outlets.

The other thing I can do is plug all the devices in the outlet that I want to move and see if I trip the breaker. If I don't trip the breaker then I should be fine with moving them. Am I correct?

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  #10  
Old 07-23-14, 11:04 AM
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You have a 200 amp 40 circuit Square D QO series panel, it won't take tandem breakers. I think I'd just combine a couple lightly loaded circuits to free up a space for the new receptacles.
 
 

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