Main Panel and Sub Panel Spacing?

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  #1  
Old 07-26-14, 05:30 PM
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Main Panel and Sub Panel Spacing?

I have a main panel that is behind finished drywall in the garage. I want to install a sub panel and plan on cutting the drywall out and using a large (2") conduit pipe for all the conductors and another large conduit pipe for the service connections. The pipes will be relatively short as I want to put the subpanel right by the main, probably 6" away. Is there a building code (typically speaking, im in the Paducah, KY area) that requires certain spacing between panels? I have heard in some businesses in TN and IL with multiple service panels they require 3 foot spacing between panels as code, but wasn't sure if that applied to homeowners in most cases. The electrician put a 20 slot 40 circuit panel in and loaded it down with tandem breakers and a couple 240v/120v quads. Absolutely no room for expansion.

Could I do the sub panel right beside the main and be ok? I would much rather do that then have to mess with multiple feet of drywall demo and repair.

Here are photos of my main panel and the wall it sits on (if either matters).
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  #2  
Old 07-26-14, 06:35 PM
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the NEC has no problem with the subpanel 6 in away. you will need a 4 wire feed to the subpanel and add a ground bar to the subpanel.
 
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Old 07-26-14, 07:16 PM
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I need another ground bar if the main panel and sub panel are in same location? The ground bar for this location is right behind the wall of the panel you see in the photo...under the meter outside. The sub panel would be right beside it? I would still run a 4 wire 60 amp circuit to sub and remove the ground / neutral bonding screw, connect ground to ground bar, neutral to it's own bar, red and black to their own sides. Didn't think this sub panel needed a ground rod?
 
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Old 07-26-14, 07:29 PM
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John is saying to add a ground bar in the sub panel not a ground rod. You do not need a ground rod for your sub panel.
 
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Old 07-26-14, 07:33 PM
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You got it tbone, no need for additional ground rod but separate ground lines and neutral lines in the sub panel by removing (or not adding) bonding screw and adding a separate ground bar to the provided hole(s) in your sub panel.
 
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Old 07-26-14, 07:52 PM
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Whoops I misread that. Thank you!
 
  #7  
Old 07-27-14, 09:41 AM
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That looks like a Cutler-Hammer BR series panel, but you have a Siemens quad breaker for the dryer and two additional single pole circuits. I don't believe the Siemens breaker is allowed in a BR panel. I'd replace the quad with the proper BR series quad if I were you.
 
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Old 07-27-14, 02:37 PM
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It's a Murray 20 slot 40 circuit panel. I believe Siemens owns Murray or something to that effect. I just replaced an AFCI with a Murray brand breaker and they look almost identical to Siemens brand (the breaker with the blue test button)
 
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Old 07-27-14, 03:03 PM
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It's a Murray 20 slot 40 circuit panel. I believe Siemens owns Murray or something to that effect. I just replaced an AFCI with a Murray brand breaker and they look almost identical to Siemens brand (the breaker with the blue test button)
My apologies to Murray!

Yes, Siemens owns Murray now and the breakers are identical down to the same molded case and probably even come from the same factory, but they are not U.L. Listed to be interchanged in each other's panels. I am not familiar with the new Murray, are Cutler-Hammer BR series breakers listed on the panel label as acceptable? The only thing I would wonder about is why a contractor would use a Murray panel and not use Murray circuit breakers.
 
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Old 07-27-14, 05:44 PM
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I couldn't find anything on the panel label itself on what is allowed, but the majority of the breakers ARE in fact cutler brand breakers. Strange... the AFCI (yellow button) breakers are as well... I recently replaced one of the cutler AFCI's with the one I mentioned previously (the Murray blue button AFCI) and they were nearly identical in connections and how they set in the panel. This panel has been installed and working on the original breakers since 2008.
 
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Old 07-27-14, 06:51 PM
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With a panel that new I would expect the correct breakers to have been used and also still available.
 
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