How should I run these lights to the panel?

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Old 07-27-14, 01:25 PM
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Question How should I run these lights to the panel?

I have a total of 20- 30 recessed LED (9 watts each) lights going in my basement that will be separated into 5 areas (5 light switches). The Living room will have 2 sections, kitchen 1, laundry room 1 and bathroom 1.

Do I put these all on one circuit and the outlets on a separate circuit/circuits. Or should I split them up and if so how should they be split up?
 
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Old 07-27-14, 01:36 PM
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Lights will be fine on their own 15 amp circuit. That way you have light if a receptacle trips a breaker. The kitchen requires two dedicated 20 amp GFCI protected receptacle circuits. The bathroom requires one dedicated GFCI protected receptacle circuit. Bathroom lights can be on the general lighting circuit or the bathroom receptacle circuit. Living room receptacles may require an AFCI breaker depending on local code cycle. Best practice two have a dedicated 120 receptacle circuit for the laundry room.
 
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Old 07-27-14, 02:16 PM
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The circuit for the lighting needs to be based on the largest size bulbs the fixtures will accept.
 
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Old 07-29-14, 01:48 PM
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Thanks for the replies This house was built in 1971, the electricity was updated with breakers and most of the wire for the downstairs was ran at that time. Is there any reason I can't use the existing wire or should I run all new wire?
 
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Old 07-29-14, 02:45 PM
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If the existing wiring can be used to provide the necessary code compliant circuits then yes. You need 3-4 circuits. Do you have wiring for 3-4 separate circuits? If so no wiring for the additional circuits will need to be added. (See my first reply for circuits needed.)
 
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Old 07-29-14, 03:02 PM
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Newer recessed lights call for 90 degree C rated insulation. Your wiring is 60 degree C rated maximum.
 
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Old 08-01-14, 09:28 PM
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Thank you, does that mean I have to run all new wire all the way from the box if my existing wire is 60 degree C rated maximum?

This is the wire I purchased 250 ft.12/2 NM-B Wire-28828269 at The Home Depot. Is this the correct wire?

Also, is it ok to connect the lights in this fashion to avoid drilling more holes? Or should the be connected in one big loop??
 
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Old 08-01-14, 09:33 PM
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No, I would need to add circuits but I was referring to the wire on the current circuit. I understand I would have to also add more but wanted to know if the existing wire would be up to code.
 
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Old 08-01-14, 09:45 PM
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If you mean cable yes if it contains a ground. Even if no ground probably grandfathered but you can't extend ungrounded circuits so best to replace it if not grounded.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 10:53 AM
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Not sure what you mean by cable. I assume this is what I've been calling electrical wire? If so yes, the old cable does have a ground.

Is the stuff I posted in the link the correct type? Also, can you confirm that the lights can indeed be connected in the fashion shown in the picture I attached as I was told by a friend to run them in a loop.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 11:01 AM
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Cable: Two or more conductors in a metallic or non metallic sheath with or without a ground .
Wire: A single conductor. Wires must be run in a raceway such as a sheath or conduit.

The cable posted is correct for a 20 amp breaker but can be used on a 15 amp breaker also.
I was told by a friend to run them in a loop.
It is not required. (Maybe he saw a UK video on Youtube.)
 
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Old 08-02-14, 11:16 AM
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Thanks so much Ray, I appreciate that you explained the difference rather than just point out that I was wrong

I planned on running 20 amp breakers for all the circuits besides the laundry which I already have a separate 120 for. Is there any reason I should run a 15 instead?

It's quite possible, he probably got most of his DIY knowledge from youtube.
 
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Old 08-02-14, 01:22 PM
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Traditionally 15 amps is usually use for lighting and general purpose 120 volt receptacles* because #14 is a bit cheaper and easier to work with but nothing wrong with using #12 on a 20 amp breaker. It in fact gives you more capacity.

*Bath and kitchen receptacles must be on 20 amp circuits supplied by #12. (Actual receptacles are the usual 15 amp type so long as there is at least one duplex receptacle.)
 
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