New oven - direct or plug connection

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  #1  
Old 07-30-14, 07:02 AM
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New oven - direct or plug connection

Just got a new oven, 240 v, 5.1 kW, 30 amp circuit req'd.

Old oven has 50 amp breaker w. 4 wire 50 amp wall plug.

New oven install manual states that oven's wiring should be connected directly to the junction box.

Is there any problem if I use a male 50 amp, 4 wire plug and utilize the existing connection instead of direct wiring?


Thanks.
 

Last edited by mtujohn; 07-30-14 at 07:19 AM.
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  #2  
Old 07-30-14, 07:21 AM
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Follow the mfg instructions
 

Last edited by tbone87; 07-30-14 at 07:49 AM. Reason: Eh
  #3  
Old 07-30-14, 07:45 AM
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The electrical code requires that the manufacturer instructions be followed. The unit is not designed or listed for use with a cord and plug. Hardwire the unit and change the breaker.
 
  #4  
Old 07-30-14, 08:12 AM
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change the breaker to a 30
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-31-14 at 09:23 PM. Reason: Remove incorect information.
  #5  
Old 07-30-14, 08:19 AM
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sure put a plug on it
Did you read the thread before posting? Are you advocating violating manufacturers instructions?
New oven install manual states that oven's wiring should be connected directly to the junction box
Mod note: Quoted post was edited to remove bad advice.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-31-14 at 09:25 PM.
  #6  
Old 07-30-14, 08:31 AM
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I would call the manufacture (ask to talk to engineering) and ask why a plug cannot be used. I never saw an electric range that does not plug into an outlet. I'm not advocating to go against the printed manufactures instructions but sometimes printed instructions don't always coincide with what can or cannot be done and still be within code.

edit: Many years ago I installed many dishwashers with outlets when in fact instructions said to hardwire it. Now days many brands suggest a plug in outlet .
 
  #7  
Old 07-30-14, 08:38 AM
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Don't disagree, Norm, but since both the receptacle and breaker are wrong why spend money on a new receptacle and plug when you can just hard wire it. If it come with a whip then that would be a third problem. The whip wouldn't probably be rated for use with a plug.
 
  #8  
Old 07-30-14, 08:47 AM
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My feeling are that since the breaker needs changing anyway,why not do both. I would like the luxury or convenience to move the unit when and if I need to clean, redo the floor or any other remodeling job that might need to move the range. Also when replacement time comes nothing is easier than plug in plug out.
 
  #9  
Old 07-30-14, 08:50 AM
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Norm, not a range. Its an oven. Most ovens I have seen can't be moved.
 
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Old 07-30-14, 09:01 AM
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I never saw an electric range that does not plug into an outlet.
If this were a freestanding electric range I would agree, but the OP stated this is just an oven. Although the OP did not specify, the description sounds as if this is a built-in oven.

mtujohn
Just got a new oven, 240 v, 5.1 kW, 30 amp circuit req'd.
I don't think I have ever seen a freestanding electric range that only required a 30 amp, 240 volt circuit.
 
  #11  
Old 07-30-14, 09:03 AM
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Then I stand corrected. I assumed a typical kitchen stove top and oven.
 
  #12  
Old 07-30-14, 09:07 AM
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But the previous device had a 50 amp breaker which sounds like a range so maybe it is a range in which case you are correct. John, is it just an oven?
 
  #13  
Old 07-30-14, 09:43 AM
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i assume we are talking about a..................wall-mounted oven.............

not a range (oven and cook top in one unit.)

befor you install the oven

MEASURE......................where is the cord going as you slide in the oven

a loop of string over the top of the oven might help to pull the cord loop up

you might have to remove part of the cabinet back to make room for the cord

you might have to remove part of the drywall to make room for the cord.

you may have to turn the outlet and recesse it into the wall
 
  #14  
Old 07-30-14, 10:02 AM
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Section 90-4. The authority having jurisdiction, often a government official of a building department for a city, county, state or federal agency, is responsible for enforcing the Code. Other persons who may be responsible are insurance inspectors and fire marshals

The inspector's responsibilities are to enforce the requirements of the Code, determine product approval, give special permission where necessary, and permit alternate material and installation methods to insure a safe installation. In addition, the inspector must insure that electrical products are installed according to the manufacturer's instructions and without unauthorized modifications.
Highlighting added by me. Source: Mike Holt Mike Holt Code Resources Is that section no longer valid?
 

Last edited by ray2047; 07-30-14 at 10:23 AM.
  #15  
Old 07-30-14, 10:53 AM
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original device was a complete range (oven and stovetop). New unit is oven only. I will point out that the mfg'r instructions specify "SHOULD BE connected directly to the junction box", not "must be". It is an IKEA oven.
 
  #16  
Old 07-30-14, 11:01 AM
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edit: Many years ago I installed many dishwashers with outlets when in fact instructions said to hardwire it. Now days many brands suggest a plug in outlet .

NEC 422.16 (B) STATES THAT disposers,dishwashers,and trash compactors

.....................shall be permitted to be cord-and-plug-connected ..........

somewhere in the code our local inspectors have desided that ALL ELECT STUFF..........MUST HAVE A disconnect......this started in2008 or 2011 code.

so now the disposer is pluged in a switched outlet under the sink.

the dish washer is pluged in a hot outlet under the sink.

all because 422.16 (B) (1) (4) and 422.16 (B) (2) (5)

SAYS.................The receptacle shall be accessible.

dishwashers used to be hardwired................than a receptacle behind the unit............now an accessible outlet over to the side

this does make it safer for the dishwasher repair person.

a GREAT deal of the NEC is drived by insurance companys...........AND if they can save one life (or avoid one claim) it is worth any amount MY (YOUR) MONEY.

RANT OVER

IF YOU ARE DOING ELECTRIC WORK AND GET A PERMITT and will have an inspector.................. talk to the inspector...................try to talk to the one who will come out to your job..........ask him how he would like IT done.

at this stage.........".how he would like IT done"........IS ALL THATS COUNTS.

DIFFERENT inspectors can read the same code and demand a different installation.
 
  #17  
Old 07-30-14, 11:04 AM
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Backing out of this discussion, not a pro. Do as you feel best within parameters set by the AHJ.
 
  #18  
Old 07-30-14, 01:11 PM
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I'm curious about why it would matter with the appliance, codes aside. Why would a mfgr specify one way or another?
 
  #19  
Old 07-31-14, 06:16 AM
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Sometimes it is just a matter of what testing the manufacturer wants to pay for. There is no need to pay for testing for a cord and plug on the oven since it does not meet the criteria to be connected with a cord. The oven is not subject to vibration or require frequent exchange.
 
  #20  
Old 07-31-14, 09:56 AM
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Interesting, and makes sense. Many thanks.
 
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