Dishwasher Circuit


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Old 08-07-14, 05:15 AM
J
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Dishwasher Circuit

Long time read, first time posting, great forum!

Bought a house last year, built in 1992. I have been slowly going through the breaker panel and re-labeling things correctly. I have just figured out that my dishwasher, fridge and an outlet serving the microwave all are on the same circuit. I havenít had a problem with the 20 amp breaker ever tripping though. I have been doing some other electrical work and would like to run a new circuit to the dishwasher. I have four total circuits in the kitchen, 2 for counter top, 1 for the above setup and another for four outlets by light switches in the kitchen. All are 12 wire/20 amp breakers.

1) 15 or 20 amp circuit? (This will ONLY serve the dishwasher)

2) Do I need a GFCI or AFCI or special type of breaker?


Thank you all for the help in advanced!
 
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Old 08-07-14, 05:50 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
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Welcomes to the forums!

I suggest a 20 amp circuit. That will give you the most flexibility later if you decide to add a disposal or something else.

NEC 2014 requires dishwashers to be GFCI protected. They are not required to be AFCI protected.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 07:41 AM
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If you have room in the panel, and you're going through the trouble of running new cable, I would suggest maybe pulling a 12/3 with ground. This way you have two circuits available near your destination using only one cable.
The wiring's a little tricky, but you could post back and the electricians can help you.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 10:52 AM
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Only issue with pulling a 12/3 is you would be required to use a two pole breaker. If the "extra" circuit is used for something that is required to be AFCI protected chances are it would need to be a two pole AFCI. Not a huge deal, just something to consider.
 
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Old 08-07-14, 12:18 PM
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Between the 3 other circuits, I think I have enough power. The house has a crawl space so itís not much trouble to run a line for it. It also helps with my generator loading. Thanks everyone!
 
 

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