Mixing wire gauges

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Old 08-13-14, 07:20 PM
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Mixing wire gauges

Can I run 8 awg Romex off a circuit that is 14-2? I wired up an outlet for a new wood stove insert using 14-2 as that was what the circuit closest to it as wired with. The installer told me after it needed to be at least 8 gauge wire as the stove is considered an appliance. Seems dumb as the thing is really only powering a small fan, but whatever.

Do I need to go back to the panel with 8 gauge or can I just wire an 10 foot run of 8 guage into the 14-2 circuit?
 
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Old 08-13-14, 07:26 PM
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The installer told me after it needed to be at least 8 gauge wire as the stove is considered an appliance. Seems dumb as the thing is really only powering a small fan, but whatever.
Unless that wood stove draws more then 12 amps #14 is fine. Assuming the wood stove is 12 amps or less I'd call the company that sent the the installer out and ask them to send a more experienced installer to inspect his work as he seem to be skill set challenged.
 
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Old 08-13-14, 07:29 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

The installer told me after it needed to be at least 8 gauge wire as the stove is considered an appliance.
I have never heard that before. I doubt he gave a code reference.

What is the amp draw of the wood stove? If it is just the fan, you should only have to size the wire to the amp draw. There should be a nameplate someplace or it shoul dbe listed in the directions.
 
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Old 08-13-14, 07:34 PM
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Can I run 8 awg Romex off a circuit that is 14-2? I wired up an outlet for a new wood stove insert using 14-2 as that was what the circuit closest to it as wired with. The installer told me after it needed to be at least 8 gauge wire as the stove is considered an appliance. Seems dumb as the thing is really only powering a small fan, but whatever.
NO................does seem dumb





the instruction booklet that came with the insert will tell you what size and type of circuit you need.

how do you hook it up.

do you plug it in a normal outlet............if yes.....then 14-2 to a 15 amp outlet is OK .
 
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Old 08-14-14, 05:27 AM
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He was probably thinking of an all-electric cooktop or range, which typically requires a 30 amp (10 gauge) to 40 amp (8 gauge) wiring all the way back to the panel.

A gas range* or a typical wood stove can be plugged into any ordinary receptacle and circuit wired with 14 or 12 gauge wiring.

The plug for the stove implies the amperes requirement and therefore the minimum circuit ampacity and wire gauge.

Repeat, check the instructions for the stove.

As far as mixing wire gauges in general, occasionally a 10 gauge or 8 gauge cable is needed for a 15 or 20 amp circuit because the distance, say to a barn or boat dock, is considerable. Here it is okay to run the heavy gauge wiring underground, tying it into an ordinary 12 gauge or 14 gauge circuit which may traverse the basement to the panel. What counts is that the breaker may not exceed the amperes rating for the thinnest wire in the entire branch circuit including sub-branches.

A length of thinner wire at the beginning of a circuit will not impose a greater voltage drop compared with a like piece of wire at the end of the circuit where the entire load on the circuit at the time goes through both (or all) pieces.

*Massachusetts and some other jurisdictions do not permit gas stoves that don't use electricity; among other things electronic ignition is required in lieu of pilot lights. This results in inconvenience if there is a power failure.
 

Last edited by AllanJ; 08-14-14 at 05:55 AM.
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Old 08-14-14, 06:36 AM
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A length of thinner wire
at the beginning of a circuit
will not impose a greater voltage drop
compared with a like piece of wire
at the end of the circuit
where the entire load on the circuit at the time goes through both (or all) pieces.
the voltage drop over the whole run will be the same no matter where you place the smaller wire.

make good joints....bad joints hurt voltage
 
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Old 08-14-14, 06:25 PM
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The installer told me after it needed to be at least 8 gauge wire as the stove is considered an appliance.
Where did you find that rummy??
 
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Old 08-14-14, 07:08 PM
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Thanks everyone. Did some research, turns out this guy was wrong and the 14-2 is fine. Thanks again.
 
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Old 08-14-14, 07:15 PM
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But what other mistakes did he make? That would have me worried.
 
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