GFCI not resetting - wiring

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  #1  
Old 08-24-14, 04:59 PM
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GFCI not resetting - wiring

I just replaced a kitchen receptacle with a GFCI lug but it is not resetting indicating that it has been mis-wired. I copied the existing plug wiring exactly so am not sure what to do next.
The GFCI indicates Line at the top and Load at the bottom.
The existing receptacle had 5 wires not including the ground.
2 white (top and bottom, line and load).
1 red & 1 black connected to the top (line)
1 black connected to bottom (load).
1 ground.

What can I try to get the correct wiring?
 
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Old 08-24-14, 05:34 PM
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If it was a standard receptacle you replaced with a GFCI ,you can't assume that the top of that receptacle was the line, you will have to use a meter to determine which is really the supply,are the red and black wire nutted with a pigtail? Check red/black to a white and black to a white,be sure to remove the whites from the receptacle.
Geo
 
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Old 08-25-14, 05:18 AM
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Is there only 1 line, i.e. at the moment there are 2 black and 1 red.
Should I only have 1 of those going into line and 2 coming out of load?
There is no pigtail or wire connector, they were just looped round the terminal on the old receptacle.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 06:45 AM
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The red wire worries me, especially if you are in Canada. Are you sure you do not have a multi wire circuit and 240 volts between the red and black?
 
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Old 08-25-14, 07:08 AM
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Well...the equipment running off it is 110V...toaster, blending machine, etc.
I'll go get an electrical meter and try it out.
The problem is the guy living here before was an electrician and he connected a lot of things up in a weird way!
 
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Old 08-25-14, 07:40 AM
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the equipment running off it is 110Vj
Red and black would be 240 but to neutral 120 so your receptacle would be 120 at each plug-in.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 12:23 PM
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if it is 240V then can I still use the gfci receptacle?
 
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Old 08-25-14, 12:51 PM
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if it is 240V then can I still use the gfci receptacle
If it is a multi wire branch circuit either the red wire or black wire will need to be capped and not used or you can change the box to a double gang box and two GFCIs, red to one GFCI receptacle and black to the other, can be used.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 03:33 PM
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Are you in Canada? This will tell us if your receptacles are split wired.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 03:37 PM
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O/P is in Canada.

.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 05:05 PM
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Yes, Canada.
The other receptacle I wanted to change to GFCI has 3 wires (1 red, 1 black, 1 white).
If I cap 1 of the black or red wires, then won't that break the circuit somewhere and cause one of the downstream receptacles to be off?
 
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Old 08-25-14, 05:36 PM
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No, it shouldn't break the circuit. However you would then only have one circuit at each outlet location which is a violation per Canada electrical code. (IIRC)

I would suggest installing a 2 pole, 20 amp GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 06:12 PM
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IIRC the CEC did not require 20 amp kitchen receptacle circuits.
 
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Old 08-25-14, 08:49 PM
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It is a 2pole 20amp GFCI receptacle although it's on a 15A breaker at the box.
The breaker at the box doesn;t indicate it's a GFCI but maybe?
 
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Old 08-25-14, 09:10 PM
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No test button not a GFCI breaker.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 04:33 AM
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Why install 2 kitchen plugs with a GFCI breaker but bathroom plugs in Canada must have GFCI receptacles?!
Also, aren't GFCI breakers 3 times the price of a receptacle GFCI?
If it's on a 15A breaker, can I still use a 20A GFCI receptacle?
The existing breaker for that circuit seems to be a 4pole
 
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Old 08-26-14, 06:28 AM
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The existing breaker for that circuit seems to be a 4pole
Do you mean a quad breaker?

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Old 08-26-14, 06:35 AM
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A standard GFI receptacle cannot be split wired on two circuits like the CEC required for kitchen circuits so the GFI protection came from a two pole breaker.

In the US you could not use the 20 amp device on a 15 amp circuit.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 08:31 AM
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It is a 2pole 20amp GFCI receptacle
No such thing. .........................
 
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Old 08-26-14, 10:07 AM
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Receptacle - GFCI Duplex Receptacle | RONA

Tamper resistant decorator duplex, GFCI receptacle, 15A, 125VT, 2 poles and 3 wire grounding.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 10:18 AM
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The term two pole applies to switches and breakers not receptacles. Whoever wrote that ad flunked Basic Electricity 101. That is just a 120 volt GFCI receptacle.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 03:09 PM
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So, the breaker image is attached (breaker turned off in image). I'm surprised there's no GFCI breaker as this was installed post 2000 so should have met the Canadian code for split wired kitchen receptacles?
The breaker says 4 pole on the label so how could I add a 2pole GFCI in its position instead?


https://drive.google.com/file/d/0BwS...it?usp=sharing
 
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Old 08-26-14, 03:47 PM
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The breaker says 4 pole on the label so how could I add a 2pole GFCI in its position instead?
The turned off breakers I see in the picture are two single pole breakers that seem to be two parts of a quad breaker. Not really a 4-pole breaker. Are the two breakers handle tied?.

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Old 08-26-14, 03:52 PM
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There is a handle tie around the two handles for a common disconnect.

That looks like a quad breaker based on the sticker width.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 04:35 PM
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PC"s eyesight is better than mine. So assuming handle tied you would replace the quad breaker with one 15 amp 2-pole GFCI breaker and two single pole 15 amp breakers and use a 15 amp receptacle with the tab on the brass side removed. Wait till a pro verifies this reply.
 

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Old 08-26-14, 05:12 PM
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The CEC did not have the same requirements for GFI protection for countertops. They were limited to only being needed close to a sink. If someone knows the exact requirements please add them.
 
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Old 08-26-14, 05:31 PM
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both these receptacles are next to the sink...within 50cm
 
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