Split wiring short circuit

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  #1  
Old 08-31-14, 08:45 AM
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Split wiring short circuit

I am replacing an old receptacle with a new one and I thought I had wired everything up in the correct way but this immediately tripped the panel breaker. https://docs.google.com/file/d/0BwSN...p=docslist_api
 
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Old 08-31-14, 08:52 AM
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You have a multi wire circuit. You need to break out the little tab between the two brass screws to separate the black and red wires of the three wire cable (top right). Look closely at the old device and you will see the missing tab between the two brass screws.

As a note: You should not put two wires under one screw. The black and red marked "top" should be connected together with a pigtail, and the pigtail should then be connected to the receptacle screw.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 08:53 AM
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You will have to remove the bridging clip on the black/red side of the receptacle. Splice the black and red wire at the top together so that only one wire connects at the receptacle.

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Old 08-31-14, 09:51 AM
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It's a15a circuit so should I get 14 guage wire for the extra wire from the pigtail?
 
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Old 08-31-14, 09:52 AM
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A 15A circuit would use #14 wire.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 10:48 AM
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I don't know if you ever noticed it or used it, but this type of wiring is designed to have one half of a receptacle always hot, and one half of the outlet switched.
This is required by code in living spaces that don't have a ceiling light.
It's designed to where you can turn on a lamp upon entering room.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 11:01 AM
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Actually in this case there are two circuits to that receptacle. That's the reason for the breaker tripping. This was common in kitchens. Now with GFI receptacles the two circuits would have to go to two GFI receptacles.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 11:29 AM
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That's the reason for the breaker tripping
PJ,
Sorry for the post, school me. I've seen multi-wire circuits, but never one that provided power to upper and lower halves of receptacle separately.
The only thing I can think of is Dishwasher/Disposal switched combo
 
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Old 08-31-14, 11:35 AM
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The red wire is one circuit and the black wire is the other circuit.
The neutral is shared. So if you were to use a voltmeter at the receptacle and you checked between the two smaller slots.... you'd measure 240vac.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 12:06 PM
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In Canada it is/was (not sure if it still is) required to have the kitchen counter top receptacles split wired in this manner. The OP is non-US and could be from Canada.
 
  #11  
Old 08-31-14, 12:29 PM
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Is this the same receptacle you were trying to replace in http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...ng-wiring.html
 
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Old 08-31-14, 02:28 PM
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I know the 2 legs will provide 240V and neutral is shared (or 240 to ground)
I find it odd that Canada would want a receptacle wired this way.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 02:41 PM
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Yes but I've decided to replace the receptacle and then eventually get a gfi breaker.
 
  #14  
Old 08-31-14, 02:55 PM
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Get yourself a 2 pole GFCI breaker and protect both circuits.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 07:00 AM
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That circuit seems to be an outlet on the counter top and the dishwasher. There is another outlet nearby with 3wires, 1 black 1 red (tab removed) 1 white. Is that split also?
Might be expensive if I need 2 separate gfci breakers at the panel.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 07:02 AM
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Likely yes. A meter check will confirm. You should get 240 volts between the red and black if it is a multiwire.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 07:36 AM
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Much of this was covered in your previous thread. Please review that and then ask about what you didn't understand. Would you like me to combine the two?
 
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Old 09-01-14, 08:15 AM
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I know the 2 legs will provide 240V and neutral is shared (or 240 to ground)
No, it would be 120 volts to ground.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 09:09 AM
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Yes,
You're right Joe, I was off on this one.
 
  #20  
Old 09-02-14, 10:56 AM
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I pulled the dishwasher out this weekend and it turns out the same circuit as the outlet is connected to the dishwasher.
It was hard wired with the electrical box just dangling on the floor (which given that the supply pipe was leaking is worrying).
I'm going to attach the electrical box to the backboard and wire in a receptacle and a plug for the dishwasher.
However, I understand that under the CEC, these split wire circuits with dishwashers now need AFCI and GFCI combined?
 
  #21  
Old 09-03-14, 06:49 AM
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I understand that under the CEC, these split wire circuits with dishwashers now need AFCI and GFCI combined?
Perhaps, few on this forum know what specific CEC requirements are. I believe the latest version of the NEC requires both AFCI and GFCI protection is some areas as well. Square D has addressed this and now has a combination AFCI/GFCI circuit breaker I believe in both the Homeline and QO product lines.
 
  #22  
Old 09-03-14, 07:08 AM
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CJ, it that Class A 5 MA protection or the Class B 30 MA protection?
 
  #23  
Old 09-03-14, 09:32 AM
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CJ, it that Class A 5 MA protection or the Class B 30 MA protection?
5 mA protection. I believe AFCI breakers have always had the Class B 30 mA GFCI protection. These are something brand new I just read about last week on Code Question of the Day. They have a purple test button for easy identification. These are not to be confused with combination type AFCI breakers. In this attachment they are being called dual function rather than combination to avoid confusion. I have yet to see one yet. The huge advantage is

The 2014 National Electric Code now requires both Combination Arc Fault
and Ground Fault protection on all 1-Pole, 15 A, and 20 A kitchen and laundry
circuits. Prior to the release of the Dual Function Circuit Breaker, a contractor
or homeowner’s only choice was to use a Combination Arc Fault circuit breaker
in conjunction with an expensive, bulky Ground Fault receptacle. The new Dual
Function circuit breakers help reduce cost and eliminate the hassle of using
two separate devices to provide essential protection.
http://www.iaeivirginia.com/clientup...ion%20AFCI.PDF

I suspect it won't be long till all manufacturers have a similar breaker with the dual function.
 
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