New duplex receptacle wiring

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  #1  
Old 08-31-14, 05:53 PM
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New duplex receptacle wiring

I made a new circuit with 1 set of two duplex receptacles and they are working fine. That's all that is currently connected to this circuit. To branch off of one of these duplex receptacles to feed another NEW set of two duplex receptacles do I just get a new strand of 12/2 wire and connect the black to brass screw and white to silver screw and ground to ground on the in place duplex and run that strand of 12/2 to the new duplex receptacle that I'm trying to add to the circuit?

My problem is the grounds. I have the ground from the 12/2 from breaker connected to first existing duplex and jumping to the 2nd duplex. So both screw already have a ground. How do I place another ground to jump to the two new duplexes I'd like to add? Should I just remove the ground to the existing set and use a wire nut with a separate bare ground from wire nut to each of the existing duplex receptacles and then a 3rd separate strand from that wire nut to the new 12/2 that's jumping to the new duplex that I'm putting in and do the same on the new receptacles? I understand the basics and how to wire but I'm having trouble with the grounds and tying them together without attaching 2 bare grounds to one terminal screw. Thanks
 
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Old 08-31-14, 06:03 PM
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You will need to cut a 5-6 inch piece of 12ga copper ground wire for each receptacle. If you have 4 total for the circuit you're discussing, then you would need 4 pieces. You will what is called "pigtail" each receptacle to the incoming and outgoing ground wire (as you should with the hot and neutral as well). So if there are two receptacles in a box, you will have 4 ground wires under a wire nut. 3 if it is a single duplex receptacle.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 09:44 PM
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Ok so for the incoming and outgoing I would tie those 2 copper wire grounds together by twisting them and then cut one off. Then do I just wire nut one ground from each of the 2 receptacles to that wire and do this same thing for the 2nd set of duplexes?
 
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Old 08-31-14, 09:49 PM
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Removing old receptacle and placing new

I plan to remove old receptacle and re place that with two duplex receptacles running new 12/2 wire. Do I just remove the 2 blacks and 2 neutrals and just wire nut those together to keep continuity to other receptacles? What do I do about a ground in that situation because all the wires in the house just have the 1 gang metal boxes with screw grounded. The receptacle itself has no ground wire attached to it but the box does that receptacle is in.
 
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Old 08-31-14, 10:32 PM
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all the wires in the house just have the 1 gang metal boxes with screw grounded
What does "with screw grounded" mean. Note, just because a box is metal does not mean it is grounded. Why do you think yours are?
 
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Old 08-31-14, 10:54 PM
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I'm not sure. The box has bare copper shoved in the back by the screw they're wrapped around. The boxes are grounded because there were many ground connections in the breaker box.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 02:26 AM
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The box has bare copper shoved in the back by the screw they're wrapped around. The boxes are grounded because there were many ground connections in the breaker box.
Then you are correct because both things are indications of the original style of installing grounded cable.

Since the receptacle box must remain in place and can't be obstructed why are you removing the receptacle? Almost reads like you were planing to bury the splice in the wall.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 09:27 AM
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Why can't the receptacle box be obstructed? I was planning on doing the connection and removing the box in the wall and placing a new plastic 3 gang box and wiring a new circuit.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 09:33 AM
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Also I would have 4 strands of ground wire in first box and 3 strands in the 2nd box because it would currently be the last duplex in the circuit. Is that the correct way to do it?
 
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Old 09-01-14, 09:41 AM
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Yes...... you would have four grounds in one wire nut in the first box and only three in the second box.
 
  #11  
Old 09-01-14, 09:59 AM
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Where the new receptacle #2 is going I'm going to be bypassing the old receptacle (removing it). With that said is it ok to wire nut the old black to black and white to white and ground to ground behind the new box that I'm placing?
 
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Old 09-01-14, 10:02 AM
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is it ok to wire nut the old black to black and white to white and ground to ground behind the new box that I'm placing?
No that must be done in a box that remains permanently accessible. The box that is there is the easiest solution.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 10:12 AM
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I have merged your two threads since they seem to be the same job.
Why can't the receptacle box be obstructed?
Code states all connections must remain assessable. If you are installing a 3-gang box there should be plenty of room for the old connection. Just remember neutrals on separate breakers stay separate but all grounds regardless of circuit are connected together.
You wrote: placing a new plastic 3 gang box and wiring a new circuit.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 12:45 PM
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Ok so just use the wire nuts for the old wires to tie together and just let them in back of new 3 gang even though they are not being used as the new receptacles will have a new circuit
 
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Old 09-01-14, 12:50 PM
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Ok so just use the wire nuts for the old wires to tie together and just let them in back of new 3 gang even though they are not being used
That is correct but be sure their grounds are connected to the grounds of the new cable.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 02:01 PM
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Is it necessary to connect there grounds to the new cable? The new cable will be grounded as well.
 
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Old 09-01-14, 02:09 PM
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Yes, code requires all grounds regardless of originating circuit be connected together.
250.148 Continuity and Attachment of Equipment Grounding Conductors to Boxes.
Where circuit conductors are spliced within a box, or terminated on equipment within or supported by a box, any equipment grounding conductor(s) associated with those circuit conductors shall be connected within the box or to the box with devices suitable for the use in accordance with 250.148(A) through (E).
 
  #18  
Old 09-01-14, 05:10 PM
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Thanks for all the great info. I'm now back to my other thread with the issues I'm having in the bathroom where I posted pics
 
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