240v Needed For Plasma Cutter

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  #1  
Old 09-01-14, 10:41 AM
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Question 220v Needed For Plasma Cutter

This is the first time I have ever posted a question on a forum. I am the kinda guy who searches and searches for hours until I find what i am looking for. Every question has already been answered. And i know that.

But for the first time in 7 years, I need a favor. I am stuck working and have no time to search. I was hoping you would be easy on me and help me out. Please.

I need to hookup two 220v (30a I would guess) lines to my box. I need to run a plasma torch on one (one outlet), and a separate Washer/Dryer Combo (runs off of one plug, so only one outlet is needed).

And I only have so long to figure this out before the Landlord hires someone to do it and sticks me with half the bill (for the extra outlet [for the plasma cutter]).

This is my Box and what I have:

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This is my Meter (if that matters):

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So my question is:

- What do I need to buy

- How should I wire it

- Any other thoughts



Please Help Me. I Promise To Return The Favor By Contributing To This Forum On A Regular Basis. I Just Signed Up.

I am an engineer (obviously not in an electrical field) and I have a lot I can contribute to this forum.

Nicholas A. Shake
 

Last edited by nshake; 09-01-14 at 12:07 PM. Reason: I think I accidentally wrote 240v. But I need 220v (I think).
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  #2  
Old 09-01-14, 11:13 AM
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Welcome to the forums.

That's a meter for a 200A service.

I see the large supply wires to that panel box but only a 20A and one other breaker.
Is that your main panel..... is this for a house ?
 
  #3  
Old 09-01-14, 11:21 AM
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Yes. Its for a house/duplex. It was originally a single adobe house. Then walled down the middle to make a duplex. Then, they needed to be able to regulate electricity to each side, so I'm assuming they then installed two separate meters.

But this is all I got for the whole house (our side of the duplex). There is a bedroom, kitchen, bathroom, living room and a den. Each room has only one outlet. Its pretty retarded how they set everything up.

I was expecting to have to buy a separate 220v box to add to the wall and wire it to this thing that's supposed to be the breaker box. I'm assuming a new box to add-on, the two 220v breakers, new wire, conduit etc...
 
  #4  
Old 09-01-14, 11:25 AM
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There has to be another panel some place that feeds your space. I can't see running your entire half on two 20 amp circuits. Do you have gas everything? Do you have A/C?
 
  #5  
Old 09-01-14, 11:25 AM
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So that is your main panel with two small breakers in it. For what you want to do now it's useless. It looks like that panel is in a wall which will compound the problem.

You would need to set a sub panel next to that one. You could pull out those two single breakers and install a new "main" breaker of 60 or 100 amps that would feed the sub panel.
 
  #6  
Old 09-01-14, 11:31 AM
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Does most of your half of the duplex loose power if the other duplex main breaker is turned off?
 
  #7  
Old 09-01-14, 12:11 PM
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RE: ray2047

Does most of your half of the duplex loose power if the other duplex main breaker is turned off?


Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz3C5ry9HyF
I live in a rural area and the only times the power has gone out, everyone's on the block has too.

The other duplex has it's own meter and its own box.

One 110v 20a goes to the kitchen, and the other 110v 20a goes to the rest of the house.

All of the house's receptacles are three-prong and grounded. There is one receptacle per room. Its an old adobe house. Over 100 years old.

Thank you for taking the time to help.
 
  #8  
Old 09-01-14, 12:14 PM
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You would need to set a sub panel next to that one. You could pull out those two single breakers and install a new "main" breaker of 60 or 100 amps that would feed the sub panel.
You would then move those circuits to the sub panel. The sub panel could be a small panel with 8 or so breakers.
 
  #9  
Old 09-01-14, 12:15 PM
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RE: PJmax

So that is your main panel with two small breakers in it. For what you want to do now it's useless. It looks like that panel is in a wall which will compound the problem.

You would need to set a sub panel next to that one. You could pull out those two single breakers and install a new "main" breaker of 60 or 100 amps that would feed the sub panel.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz3C5sR76Bc
I wasn't planning on wiring anything into that box. I thought maybe about a 220v 30a sub-box to attach to the wall beside this mess of a box in the wall. Then run a 220v 30a about 3ft down from the box to a receptacle. Then running the other 220v 30a up into the ceiling with conduit to the kitchen (where the washer/dryer is) and down the wall to another receptacle for the washer/dryer combo.

How would that work? Would it work? What type of wire would you suggest? I have 200ft of 12-2 that I got for free and I thought that I could double up on them and use them together instead of buying new wire.

Thank you for replying. Thank you.
 
  #10  
Old 09-01-14, 12:18 PM
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So I couldn't just add a box to the side and wire the wall box to the new box with two 220v breakers? I am just trying to look for the most cost effective way to do this. Its a rental and I will only be here for 6 more months. After leave, they will be remodeling this house and rewiring it. The problem is that I will be somewhere else (hopefully in a house without issues like this).
 
  #11  
Old 09-01-14, 12:20 PM
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You can add a new box next to the existing one BUT power must come from the existing box.
 
  #12  
Old 09-01-14, 12:22 PM
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RE: Tolyn Ironhand

There has to be another panel some place that feeds your space. I can't see running your entire half on two 20 amp circuits. Do you have gas everything? Do you have A/C?

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz3C5qs96Lg
I know, its odd. But yes, it all runs off of the two 20a 110v's.

Heater- Yes
Air Conditioning- I wish, its 105 right now :-)
 
  #13  
Old 09-01-14, 01:09 PM
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RE: PJmax

You can add a new box next to the existing one BUT power must come from the existing box.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ne...#ixzz3C63A7m6x
So From Here:

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...... What Would You Do?
 
  #14  
Old 09-01-14, 01:23 PM
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The other duplex has it's own meter and its own box.
I know off topic of your question and I'm sure you don't mind but I expect your neighbor is paying for most of your electricity.
Heater- Yes
Especially with electric heat. When the house was split it would have been labor intensive to split up the electric. I'm guessing that wasn't done.

Is there any labeling on the box that tells you what size panel it is, example 60 amps. What size are those two breakers? Can you tell us the make and model number of the panel?

Caveat: For reasons of liability you should never do work on a house you don't own.

The best way to fix this is replace what in my opinion is a totally inadequate breaker box with at least a 12 space 100 amp main breaker panel.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-20-14 at 08:13 AM.
  #15  
Old 09-01-14, 01:37 PM
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RE: ray2047

The other duplex has it's own meter and its own box.
I know off topic of your question and I'm sure you don't mind but I expect your neighbor is paying for most of your electricity.
Heater- Yes
Especially with electric heat. When the house was split it would have been labor intensive to split up the electric. I'm guessing that wasn't done.

Is there any labeling on the box that tells you what size panel it is, example 60 amps. What size are those two breakers? Can you tell us the make and model number of the panel?

Caveat: For reasons of liability you should never do work on a house you don't own.

The best way to fix this is replace what in my opinion is a totally inadequate breaker box with at least a 12 space 100 amp main breaker panel.

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...#ixzz3C6AiUpU0
The heater is an old blower. The only electricity it uses is for the fan. Besides that, there is no other electrical connection to it. The pilot costs money to stay on during the winter, but that's it. The blower has a two prong cord that runs 110v. If the electricity goes out, the furnace still works.

The two breakers are 110v 20a. There is only one outlet in each room. Not very many things can be plugged in without making things dangerous.

We do not have a television, or watch TV. And we only really have lights plugged in and a modem for the internet router.

The only thing available for the panel that I can see is:

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The Meter is pretty new (picture in OP).
 
  #16  
Old 09-01-14, 01:59 PM
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Assuming you want to accept the responsibility you would remove the existing breakers and put a 50 amp half width 240 volt GE breaker in the two center slots (2-3) and two half width GE 20 amp breakers in the outside slots (1 and 4).

You would use #6 to feed a 60 amp breaker panel with space for two 30 amp 240v breakers. There would be two #6 black, one #6 white and one #10 green between the panels. If you ever try to use the plasma machine and washer/dryer at the same time breakers will probably trip.

Above assumes the washer dryer has a single 120/240 feed. If separate receptacle for each then this won't work.

Above assumes #12 cable on the two existing 120 volt circuits. If #14 use 15 amp breakers in positions 1 and 4..
 
  #17  
Old 09-01-14, 02:30 PM
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RE: ray2047

Assuming you want to accept the responsibility you would remove the existing breakers and put a 50 amp half width 240 volt GE breaker in the two center slots (2-3) and two half width GE 20 amp breakers in the outside slots (1 and 4).

You would use #6 to feed a 60 amp breaker panel with space for two 30 amp 240v breakers. There would be two #6 black, one #6 white and one #10 green between the panels. If you ever try to use the plasma machine and washer/dryer at the same time breakers will probably trip.

Above assumes the washer dryer has a single 120/240 feed. If separate receptacle for each then this won't work.

Above assumes #12 cable on the two existing 120 volt circuits. If #14 use 15 amp breakers in positions 1 and 4..

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ne...#ixzz3C6NTpb50
Thank you very much ray2047. You saw what knowledge level I had, recognized it, and then explained it perfectly so I could understand. Not too much, not too little. Thank you and I will report back after I am done. If any problems arise, I'll get back faster.

One more thing. When you talk about assuming responsibility, do you mean that wiring it like this is not something that should be permanent, or that I could hurt myself?

I just want to say that I would never blame anyone for anything that happened to me. Advice given is for me to make my own decisions on. And I willingly accept all responsibility for any actions I might take whether they are from suggestions here or not.
 

Last edited by nshake; 09-01-14 at 03:01 PM.
  #18  
Old 09-01-14, 03:16 PM
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ray2047

One more thing:

- are there any name variations for the half-width breakers?
- it has to be a 50a 240v (not a 220v)?
- if you were to search for these breakers on Amazon, what search terms would you use?

Thanks Again :-)
 
  #19  
Old 09-01-14, 03:32 PM
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When you talk about assuming responsibility, do you mean that wiring it like this is not something that should be permanent, or that I could hurt myself
No. If the house burns down for any reason even if not really related to your work the insurance company or anyone else could clam it was and sue you. If anyone is injured or killed you could face criminal charges. That is why it is best to let an electrician do it.

Your house is supplied with 240 volts but some people say 220 volts. The more proper term would be 50 amp 2-pole 1 inch breaker. GE Q-Line 50 Amp 1 in. Double-Pole Circuit Breaker-THQP250 at The Home Depot (Full size breakers are 2 inch.)

Be sure the breaker you buy is listed for your panel. See the label. My example doesn't seem to be.

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  #20  
Old 09-01-14, 03:50 PM
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Update: Need To Wire 2nd Box

UPDATE:

The handyman said that he cannot find proper breakers to use (slim/thin/half). And that we have to wire a separate box to the side.

If you had to do a separate box, how would you do it?

=============

I am mostly afraid because the last time the electrician did something, they ripped me off and I didn't find out till later (when I searched for some answers).

If the landlord's brother comes to do it (who isn't an electrician, just a handyman) then I will tell him this would be the best way to do it without breaking my bank.

If the electrician comes, at least I will have the knowledge now to know what's going on so he doesn't rip me off again.

I am not going to attempt it myself. I am going to call the handyman and tell him how I want it done. This way it will be in him. If he doesn't want to or doesn't feel comfortable doing it, then I'll just make sure to be here for the electrician.

Thanks for the advice. I am going to go ahead and get the parts online so that I won't have to pay double for parts if the electrician comes out.

I hope that someone else in the same situation will be able to get something out of this as well.

Thanks Again.

EDIT:

For me it would be like this I think:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/...L._SL1500_.jpg

General Electric THQP250 Circuit Breaker, 2-Pole 50-Amp Thin Series - Magnetic Circuit Breakers - Amazon.com
 

Last edited by nshake; 09-01-14 at 05:22 PM. Reason: Update
  #21  
Old 09-01-14, 09:38 PM
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That panel is so limiting I would look at removing it and installing a larger panel.
 
  #22  
Old 09-02-14, 06:41 AM
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The breaker you listed will probably work but I am not seeing THQP on the label. A parts house using a GE catalog could probably cross reference it to be sure.

I agree with PCBoss' comment. As I wrote earlier:
The best way to fix this is replace what in my opinion is a totally inadequate breaker box with at least a 12 space 100 amp main breaker panel.
 
  #23  
Old 09-02-14, 01:19 PM
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Looking through the GE catalog, I could not find any of the listed breakers. I would suspect they have been discontinued and the THQP breakers are the standard. Contacting the manufacture would confirm this.

Others may be more familiar with GE products.
 
  #24  
Old 09-03-14, 08:59 AM
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There is a Siemens Type QP breaker in the box now that shouldn't be there, but that also tells me that a GE Type THQL breaker will also fit. I have to also agree with others, replace the panel.
 
  #25  
Old 09-20-14, 08:10 AM
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Went With Advice And Replaced My Main Panel

I decided that I should go the safe way (as suggested) and install a new main panel.

I did this myself (where I live, there isn't much code enforced and an electrician isn't required for things like this). I called the electric company and asked them to come a with off my power the next day. They came and asked if I needed the meter removed or the meter removed and the wires cut. They said by just removing the meter that the wires would still be hot. When they removed the meter, I was able to see why. So I asked them to also cut the wires up at the power line. They removed my meter, then drive into the street with their lift and launched one of their own up to the power line. Five minutes later, an employee came to check power at my box to endure that everything was dead. And it was.

It took me about 10 minutes of poking around and quickly touching things to be comfortable with what the electric company employees told me (about the power completely being off). I just wanted to be double sure.

I live in an old (real) adobe and after hooking up an extension to my neighbors (for light) I was able to start hacking away at the adobe walls. I had to fit a new panel into a spot where a much smaller panel (2 breaker slot with no main breaker or shutoff) had been for probably 50+ years.

I got everything wired up nice and the electric company employees even helped me out by checking everything I did to ensure nothing bad happened when they turned the power back on.

They turned everything back on (reconnected the wires at the power lines) and then (a little hesitantly) they pit the meter on and asked me to flip the switches on inside. Everything came on and was fine.

So now my next question:

I have this L6-30 (250v 30a) to hook up to a brand new box with its very own double pole 30a breaker. From what I have found online, it (the L6-30) comes with 2 Hots and 1 "Equipment" Ground.

When rewiring everything in my Main Panel, I noticed (and confirmed) that the ground (ground connection) is at the meter and goes down (protected by conduit) to the ground (ground actual dirt ground). I asked the electric company employees about this connect time and they said the meter is grounded. I asked if I needed to add another ground rod, and they said no. They said it was connected to the neutral at the meter and then fed to the main panel through the neutral wire (I have 2 Hots and 1 Neutral coming from the meter to my main panel).

In my new Main Panel, there is a Neutral Bus and a Ground Bus that are Bonded. Any wires going to breakers in the main panel that have a neutral and/or ground are wired to their correct bar (ground to ground bus and neutral to neutral bus). I heard that it doesn't matter at the Main Panel and that in reality they all (the neutral and ground wires) can be wired to either side of a Main Panel. In my old Main Panel (the one I took out) it only had 1 Bus (that was wired to the meter's neutral [that was also connected to the meter's ground connection outside]) and both neutral and ground were both sharing this Bus.

So, I wire the 2 Hots to the double pole 30a breaker, and then the other wire (of the 3 wires from the L6-30) to the Bonded Neutral/Ground Bus? Does it matter which Bus I wire it to (Neutral or Ground) because they are both Bonded at the Main Panel? Or do I need to do something else?

Thanks
 
  #26  
Old 09-20-14, 08:18 AM
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At the main panel (box with first over current protection device {OCPD}) the ground and neutral can land on either bar.
 
  #27  
Old 09-20-14, 09:12 AM
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"At the main panel (box with first over current protection device {OCPD}) the ground and neutral can land on either bar."

So the 2 Hots go to the Double-Pole Breaker and the 3rd wire (from the L6-30) goes to either side of the Bonded Bus (regardless of it being bare/green/white/ground/neutral?)

I don't get what the OCPD is though... Do I have one?

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  #28  
Old 09-20-14, 09:25 AM
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OCPD is a fuse, or in your case, a circuit breaker. Yes, you have them. The 100 is your main OCPD and the ones below it are your branch circuit OCPD.

A few things about your install:
1) It appears you have aluminum wire. You should have anti oxidation paste on the aluminum conductors.
2) Your neutral wire should be marked with white tape.
3) If this is your main panel, the neutral bus should be bonded to the panel case with the green screw provided with your panel. Your panel case is ungrounded.
4) I can't quite see in your picture, but it doesn't appear you have any type of connecter where the wires enter the panel. If there is none, this should also needs to be corrected.
5) If this is your main panel, you should have a #6 copper ground going outside to a ground rod, and another #6 copper wire going to your water service where it enters your home.
 
  #29  
Old 09-20-14, 04:39 PM
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After all you went through, why did you put such a small panel in? It looks like it is almost full already.
 
  #30  
Old 09-26-14, 10:50 PM
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"After all you went through, why did you put such a small panel in? It looks like it is almost full already."

The picture includes the sores I purchased. I was making sure the cover I bought would fit if the Panel were in fact full. The extras aren't there anymore.

All that is in there now is 2x20a singles and 1x30a double.

I am only using half of the panel.

And with the actual size of this 100 year old "real" adobe house, nothing bigger is needed. This house was running off of a 30a-subpanel-sized panel before I installed this one and only had to single slots in it.

I didn't want to have to wire everything down the walls. It would look like crap. And all the wiring in there now was updated like 20 years ago. They brought in these huge drills to drill from the roof, down and through the walls. The house is completely constructed of clay, sand and bailing hay. There is no lumber or supports (except for in an addition to the front mud room [where the panel is] and it is just the same as the rest of the house except for that it has a single 2x4 every 10ft that they stuck in 6" holes in the ground before they started laying the adobe bricks).

If you make too big of a hole in the wall or drill in a crappy supported area, the walls will cave in. Our south bathroom wall did that last year and the roof came down with it...
 
  #31  
Old 09-26-14, 11:20 PM
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Smile Reply To: Tolyn Ironhand

Thank you for the info. I did in fact notice (and wonder about) the aluminum wire coming in and the electric company stated it was pretty common in this area.

I will get that paste you speak of when they come do another disconnect next week. I need to replace a piece of conduit from the meter to the box. It was shattered from pressure over time (I think). And almost cut through the main incoming wires.

I will mark the neutral now. Thanks. The only reason I myself knew for sure which was which, was because of the lengths of the lines. All three were in order and one was smaller than the previous. I took photos before and during removal and noted every step to make sure I had for backup. I took like 30 pictures before removing the old one.

I am going to put in the connector with the new conduit. I made sure to wrap the inner hole really well to prevent any piercing until next week.

I have the ground screw for the panel bonding (its my main panel) and will also install this next week.

And lastly, I too was wondering about the grounding wires and rods/clamps. I asked the electric company employees about it when they were here and they explained to me that the meter was grounded with a rod and that:

Outside of the house at the meter, there is a long pipe going into the ground. The employee told me that this was conduit protecting the grounding wire that fed straight down and was clamped to a grounding rod underground. He said that they install them like that. The grounding rod wire connects at the meter with the incoming service neutral (from the power lines). When they removed the meter, I saw the setup. There was a wire (as thick as the others) coming up from the ground rod and on coming into the meter from the bottom right at an angle, then a hot on the top left and on the top right coming into the meter from the power line, and then the neutral from the power line that came in from the left bottom side of the meter (and it was on an angle and crossing the ground at the meter). The wires were all positioned in a commercially made enclosure for the meter and were in places that you could see were specifically made for the wires. Then there we're clamps at all three lines (the ground and neutral being one where they crossed) and then there was a very VERY short piece of aluminum wire clamped down and fed through the wall and into the box (the one's you were commenting on).

We don't have metallic water pipes. Every thing is PEX. I worked as a plumber for 5 years in California, and I was pretty sure that water supplies couldn't be ran with PEX. In New Mexico, you can supply drinking water with PEX.

Should I install another grounding rod? Should I run a wire from the meter's grounding rod into the box and onto the ground bus bar or does in not matter because its my main panel and the neutral and ground bus bars are bonded together already? When I bond the ground bus bar to the main panel's box with the included green screw, will that change anything and what does it do to help?

Again, thank you for all your time and help. I am just suorised that you don't need to be an electrician or have a license or permit to rewire your house and/or install a new main panel where I live. The electric company said they didn't require anything. I would be screwed with out this help. Thank you VERY much.

EDIT:

Is how they explained the meter being grounded not true? I have heard a lot about the electric company workers and that a lot of them are grandfathered in and don't know anything about their jobs.

Could that pipe going to the meter and connecting to the service's neutral (before entering the house as one line) be something else and they just don't know what they're talking about?

In the picture below, my house complies with #1 & #2. In #2, the ground wire running down to the rod is enclosed in a pipe/conduit. It connects to the neutral at the meter and then runs into the main panel as the neutral. There is not a sub panel or service disconnect like the picture shows though. I was under the impression that the ground wire (like in the picture) didn't need to run into the main panel. If the service disconnect was removed from this picture below, then just the neutral would run into the panel on the right. Right? That's what I had interpreted from everything I learned, but I am sure I could have got some wrong information from the electric company employees. Highly possible in this town.

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So what else can I do?


Also wanted to add (for keyword and searches) that this 250v 30a hookup was mainly intended to run a: Lotos LTP5000D or LT5000D Plasma Cutter / Torch that came with an L6-30 / L6-30R Setup.
 

Last edited by nshake; 09-27-14 at 12:01 AM. Reason: Added Information On Lotos LTP5000D
  #32  
Old 09-27-14, 06:00 AM
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There are some minor differences on how things are done state to state, but here is what we do in MN.

The meter can (The steel enclosure) is grounded through the neutral connection of the transformer from the power company. The main panel can is grounded in a similar way using the large green screw that should have came with your panel which bonds the neutral to the can. The screw goes where I marked below. It sounds like you only need one ground rod.

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  #33  
Old 09-27-14, 05:32 PM
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Reply To: Tolyn Ironhand

"There are some minor differences on how things are done state to state, but here is what we do in MN.

The meter can (The steel enclosure) is grounded through the neutral connection of the transformer from the power company. The main panel can is grounded in a similar way using the large green screw that should have came with your panel which bonds the neutral to the can. The screw goes where I marked below. It sounds like you only need one ground rod."


I know that you are right about all of this. But I still don't get why there is a Ground Rod that feeds to the meter and then connects to the Service's Neutral before it is then fed to the Main Panel as one line (Neutral)?

They said that it (my Setup) was basically like this below, but without the Service Disconnect/Subpanel (#3):

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A Ground Rod below the Meter that connects to the Service's Neutral at the Meter and then the Neutral feeding into the Main Panel. No Ground wires from the Meter to the Main Panel.

I am just wondering because I don't know if that changes any of the things you told me I needed to do. I also was just sort of curious for my own knowledge.

I get that the Service Neutral grounds the Meter. But I don't get why it is also I grounded with the Ground Rod underground. And why the Ground is meeting the Service's Neutral at the Meter, and then running to the Main Panel as just one line (Neutral).

If you want, I can try and draw it out to show you what I mean. I don't know if I am making any sense because I am not a professional or an electrician and I don't know if my words are the right way to describe things. But I am pretty sure I am at least close?

All I need to do is install that Main Panel Ground Screw to the Bus Bar? When you said I needed 1 Ground Rod, did you mean that I already have the one outside at the Meter and that's all I need? Or that I need to install another one in addition? Can I use the Ground Rod at the Meter?

Again, Thank You Soooooo Much for your time.

N. Shake
 
  #34  
Old 09-27-14, 06:22 PM
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I still don't get why there is a Ground Rod that feeds to the meter and then connects to the Service's Neutral before it is then fed to the Main Panel as one line (Neutral)?
The intent is to ground the neutral conductor and some utilities require it be done differently than others. Your neutral is grounded in the meter socket and then the grounded neutral conductor is bonded to the main panel box with the green bonding screw so that the panel box is also grounded. From that neutral bus in the main panel you should also have a GEC to the water service entry into the house, if it is metallic.

The utility diagrams you posted are indeed strange to me, but I once saw that houses near Ft. Campbell Kentucky (in Tennessee) have the neutral conductors grounded at the service connection drip loop. That was really weird from what I have always seen, but as Tolyn said, it is sometimes done differently in different states and sometimes also done differently in different municipalities.
 
  #35  
Old 09-28-14, 08:12 AM
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What is shown in the picture is done commonly in my area. The neutral, which is also the messenger wire of the triplex, is connected to the steel mast. The mast is then connected to the meter can which effectively bonds it. However, the neutral is still bonded in the can as well.

The picture you have posted is showing that the mast, meter socket, and first disconnect enclosure are all grounded to the ground rod. This does not mean that you have to run a separate conductor for each one. If they are all bonded together then you only need to run one conductor to the rod, which is done in the in the main panel in my area most times.

The ground rod is a low impedance path to ground for things like lighting strikes.
 
  #36  
Old 09-28-14, 09:22 AM
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RE: Tolyn Ironhand & CasualJoe

RE: Tolyn Ironhand & CasualJoe

So I am okay then as long as I install the Green Bonding screw in th main panel?

Also, just as an FYI (I spent an hour writing a very VERY elaborate Reply yesterday, but it was erased.. Maybe because I posted a link in it to the website I got the photo from? I don't know) the photo/diagram that everyone says is unfamiliar is taken from the NEC 2005 and is from "Service Grounding Connections"- Section 250.24(A)(1). I am unsure if that helps explain it more, and I am not even sure it is still valid (due to it coming from the NEC 2005).

I found the photo while looking for a better way to describe my current situation (even though my setup did not include a Service Disconnect or Subpanel). And it came up in a Google Search. I was only trying to give credits to where the photo was from and show which site it came from, but I guess I did something wrong because the whole Reply I posted was taken down. A lot of the Reply was unrelated to the photo's origin. I don't remember exactly what else I said in that Reply, but I know I was trying to confirm my setup and I had a few other questions to ask (that I can't recall right now). If I think if them I will try posting again.

Thank You Soon Much for all your Help and Time.

I hope that anyone else with an odd setup like mine will be able to get some help from this thread. Especially people trying to hookup a Lotos LTP5000D.
 
  #37  
Old 09-28-14, 09:35 AM
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Just an FYI - the picture is how it is done in my area, just not three separate wires. I think the picture is just showing that all three parts need to be grounded to the ground rod, and neutral, not necessarily separate wires.

If you read the picture it says, "A grounded electrode conductor must connect the neutral conductor to a grounding electrode at the: Service drop, Meter enclosure, OR Service disconnect." Note it says "or" not "and". That means you can connect the GEC to any of these places. In my area this is mostly done at the service disconnect.

Your installation is basally the same as the picture (without the sub panel of course), just instead of a single disconnect you have a panel with a main breaker. The main breaker is the disconnect.
Yes, it sounds so me like you are OK if you install the green screw, and you have a GEC to a ground rod/pipe connected to one of the locations outlined above.
 
  #38  
Old 09-28-14, 09:41 AM
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Thank You. Thank You Very Very Much.
 
  #39  
Old 09-28-14, 07:51 PM
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I took the picture to mean that there are three different methods of grounding the neutral conductor and not that all three had to be done.
 
  #40  
Old 10-05-14, 04:44 PM
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Question Smaller Gauge (AWG) Wire to Larger Gauge (AWG) Wire

I have been running low on wire and just discovered a roll of MTW/THHN 6 AWG that our neighbors left behind when they moved to London (out by the trash cans in a huge black trash bag).

Can I run 10/3 Romex from the Breaker (Main Panel) to a junction box and then run the 6 AWG outside to my L6-30 receptacle (in LiquidTight Conduit with all proper fittings)?

I only ask because I am broke and I have a 500' roll of 6 AWG MTW/THHN. Free is much cheaper for me ;-)

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Thank You Guys So Much
 
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