How To Replace a 3-Way Switch with a receptacle.

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Old 09-02-14, 06:26 PM
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Question How To Replace a 3-Way Switch with a receptacle.

So i hate the switch in the basement for the lights i never use it because i always use the one at the top of the stairs.

I have 2 white wires capped off (Guessing its the neutral)
2 black wires (I don't think the electrician who did it cared about color coding.)
One Red wire on the right side of the switch.

I am asking if i can do this.
And if so how, will i need to make big changes to my homes wiring?


Any help is appreciated!
 
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Old 09-02-14, 06:38 PM
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The upper right hand side of the switch means nothing. What color was on the odd/dark colored screw

Actually I can guess the setup. You had a black wire on the odd colored screw and a red and black wire on the silver or light colored screws.

You need to check the black wire that connected to the dark colored screw for 120vac power.
We need to determine which end of the three way switches is fed and which side goes to the lights.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 06:43 PM
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Black like the one below it.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 06:46 PM
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Black like the one below it.
Please explain what is black and what below means since there is no above or below on a 3-way switch.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 06:46 PM
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Both wires on the dark colored screws are black.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 06:58 PM
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There should be only one dark colored screw but you wrote screws. Did you mean screw? If two wires and both were on the screw then that is probably your power in plus a power out so you should be able to add a receptacle.

Local code may require the 3-way switch if these are stairs but there are still options for adding a receptacle.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 07:10 PM
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Sorry i mean't screw but there is another black wire on the common terminal.

The light switch controls the lights at the bottom of the stairs and the hallway beside it.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 07:14 PM
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I Mean Traveler. Oh My Im Screwing Up
 
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Old 09-02-14, 07:22 PM
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You will need to remove the wire on the common and using a multimeter check for ~120 volts to ground.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 07:45 PM
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One problem my multimeter is busted.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 08:21 PM
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Okay i ran to the store and bought a cheap multimeter and i got 120 volts.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 08:22 PM
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An $8-$15 analog is cheaper then and electrician or connect a receptacle to black and ground and plug in a light.
 
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Old 09-02-14, 08:57 PM
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An $8-$15 analog is cheaper then and electrician or connect a receptacle to black and ground and plug in a light.
Could you rephrase that black and ground don't i need 2 wires?
 
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Old 09-02-14, 09:23 PM
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When you test it is easier with a multimeter to test black to ground instead of black to neutral because it is harder to touch a probe to the neutral. I just transferred my instructions to using a receptacle. (Black to brass, ground to silver) but you can pigtail the two neutrals to silver probably a bit safer.
 
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Old 09-07-14, 04:16 PM
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I tested it with my new multimeter and it appears this is the first switch.
 
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Old 09-07-14, 04:45 PM
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Not sure what you mean. Do you mean you have power where you want to put the receptacle?
 
 

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